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Anti-Bullying

 

At George Washington Primary School we are committed to providing a caring, safe and friendly environment for all our children so that they can learn and play in a relaxed and secure environment and meet their potential. Bullying of any kind is unacceptable and will not be tolerated in our school. We take all incidents of bullying seriously.  

 

We expect all pupils to feel safe in school and that they feel confident to seek support from school should they feel unsafe.

 

 

 

WHAT IS BULLYING?

 

The Anti-Bullying Alliance define bullying as:

 

“The repetitive, intentional hurting of one person or group by another person or group, where the relationship involves an imbalance of power.”

 

 

 

BULLYING CAN BE:

 

Physical Bullying 

This kind of bullying includes a range of aggressive behaviours in which one person aims to cause bodily harm to another person.  This may be kicking, hitting, biting or spitting.

 

Verbal Bullying 

Some people say that “words will never hurt you,” but anyone who has been on the receiving end of verbal bullying knows that cruel words and scary threats can, indeed, be very painful.

 

Relational Bullying 

In relational bullying, children use friendship - and the threat of taking their friendship away - to hurt others.  Because it often happens within the context of a once trusting friendship, relational bullying can be especially confusing and hurtful.

 

Cyberbullying 

This specific form of bullying involves technology. Cyberbullying can be especially destructive because of how quickly and how widely cruel messages can spread.  This may include setting up ‘hate websites’, sending offensive text messages, emails and abusing the victims via their mobile phones.

 

 

BULLYING IS NOT:

 

It is important to understand that bullying is not the odd occasion of falling out with friends, name calling or arguments. It is bullying if it is done several times on purpose. Children sometimes fall out or say things because they are upset. We all have to learn how to deal with these situations and develop social skills to repair relationships.  However, if you would like support to do this, any member of school staff will be happy to help and guide you to working on these relationships.

 

 

WHAT CAN YOU DO IF YOU ARE BEING BULLIED?

Wherever you are in school, you have the right to feel safe. Nobody has the right to make you feel unhappy. If someone is bullying you, it is important to remember that it is not your fault and there are people who can help you.

The most important thing is that you tell someone so that we can deal with the situation as swiftly as possible.  Here are some strategies to help you.

 

  • Tell someone you can trust – it can be a teacher, a teaching assistant, a lunchtime supervisor, a parent, a friend, a brother, a sister or a relative.
  • If you are scared, ask a friend to go with you when you tell someone.
  • If you don’t feel you can talk to someone about it, write it down and post it in the ‘Worry’ box.
  • When you tell an adult about the bullying give them as many facts as you can (What? Who? Where? When? Why? How?).
  • Keep a diary of what’s been happening and refer to it when you tell someone.
  • Keep on speaking out until someone listens and helps you.
  • Never be afraid to do something about it and quick.
  • Don’t suffer in silence.
  • Don’t blame yourself for what is happening.
  • Call a helpline.

 

 

WHAT CAN YOU DO IF YOU SEE SOMEONE BEING BULLIED? (The role of the bystander)

 

Ignoring bullying is cowardly and unfair to the victim. Staying silent means the bully has won and gives them more power. There are ways you can help without putting yourself in danger. Here are some strategies below:

 

  • Don’t smile or laugh at the situation.
  • Don’t rush over and take the bully on yourself.
  • Don’t be made to join in.
  • Shout for help.
  • Let the victim(s) know that you are going to get help.
  • Tell a member of staff as soon as you can.
  • Try and befriend the person being bullied.
  • Encourage the person to talk to someone and get help.
  • Ask someone you trust about what to do.
  • If you don’t feel you can talk to someone about it, write it down and post it in the ‘Worry’ box.
  • Call a helpline for some advice.

 

 

FURTHER INFORMATION, SUPPORT AND HELP

There is a lot of information and guidance available about bullying that can provide a wide range of support and help. The following list is just a small selection of the support available that teachers, parents and children have found useful.

 

Name of organisation

Telephone number

Website

 

 

Act Against Bullying

0845 230 2560

www.actagainstbullying.com

Anti-Bullying Alliance (ABA)

0207 843 1901

www.anti-bullyingalliance.org.uk

Anti-bullying Network

0131 651 6103

www.antibullying.net

Beatbullying

0845 338 5060

www.beatbullying.org.uk

Bully Free Zone

01204 454 958

www.bullyfreezone.co.uk

Bullying Online

020 7378 1446

www.bullying.co.uk

BBC

not available

www.bbc.co.uk

Childline

0800 1111 (helpline for children)

www.childline.org.uk

Kidscape

020 7730 3300 (general enquiry number)
08451 205 204 (helpline for adults only)

www.kidscape.org.uk
www.beyondbullying.com

NSPCC

0207 825 2500

www.nspcc.org.uk