Year 6

 

At the end of each year, we normally have our open afternoon where you can look at your child's work and talk to their teacher. We also ask for your feedback about your child's year at George Washington. We would still like to hear your comments so we would appreciate it if you could spend a couple of minutes writing your comments in the survey below.

https://www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/GJ7SGTS

Week Commencing 13.07.2020

30 Minute Family Workout

English

1. Primary School Memories

Over two sessions, you are going to create a booklet about your primary school memories. This booklet will be a summary of your time at George Washington Primary School. The booklet will cover the following sections:

  • A letter to say thank you 
  • Your proudest achievements
  • Your funniest memory
  • Your favourite topics
  • Your favourite trips
  • Advice for those starting in year 6
  • Your favourite memory from KS1
  • Your favourite memory from KS2
  • Your future predictions

Maths

1. Magic Squares

In a magic square, the sum of each row, column and diagonal is the same.

 

In the example below, all the rows, columns and diagonal lines must add up to 34. Therefore, your first calculation would be
2 + 13 + 8 to find out the total of the numbers in that particular row so far. The answer is 23 so we need to do 34 - 23. The answer of 11 will then go in the space in that row.

 

Complete the magic square questions in the documents below. 

Name
 Green Magic Squares.pdfDownload
 Pink Magic Squares.pdfDownload
 Yellow Magic Squares.pdfDownload
Showing 1-3 of 3

2. Logic Puzzles

Complete the logic puzzles in the documents below. In each document is a results table where you can record your answers.

Name
 Einstein's Riddle.pdfDownload
 Plane Logic Puzzle.pdfDownload
Showing 1-2 of 2

3. Logic Puzzles

Complete the logic puzzles in the documents below. In each document is a results table where you can record your answers.

Name
 Cookie Logic Puzzle.pdfDownload
 Narnia Logic Puzzle.pdfDownload
Showing 1-2 of 2

4. Sudoku Puzzles

When completing sudoku puzzles, there are not many rules that you have to follow. Look at the example below. The numbers 1 to 4 (it's a 4 by 4 grid) must be filled in each row, column and box. Each number can and must be filled in only once. Your job is to work out the missing numbers in the puzzle. Start in the column or row that has the most information.

 

Complete the sudoku puzzles in the documents below. 

 

Name
 Sudoku Puzzles.pdfDownload
Showing 1-1 of 1

History

1. Tudor Homes

In Tudor England, people lived in timber-framed houses with whitewashed walls. Find out more about Tudor houses and what it was like to live in them, and follow our instructions to turn some old cardboard boxes into your very own model Tudor house!

 

What did a Tudor house look like?
One of the things that you'll notice straight away about Tudor houses is that they are white with black lines all over them.  This is because they are whitewashed and their wooden frames and beams are left exposed. The frames were joined together by wooden pegs, not nails, and the houses had steep roofs.  These were usually thatched, although richer people had tiles on their roofs. The walls were made from wattle and daub, which is the name for woven sticks covered with a mixture of clay and animal dung!

 

What was it like living in a Tudor house?
Most Tudor houses had earth floors, which were very hard to keep clean. As only rich people could afford carpets, most people covered the floor with rushes and simply replaced them when they became too dirty. Furniture tended to be made of oak and was heavy and uncomfortable. Usually, people had stools and benches rather than chairs. People had gardens but these were normally quite small and were used to grow vegetables and herbs. Only very rich people had big gardens. Sometimes these would include fancy features like fountains or even mazes.

 

Watch the video below to learn how to make your own model Tudor home. Once you have watched the video, follow the instructions below the video to help you make your model. 

 

Instructions

  • To start with, you'll need two rectangular cardboard boxes - one slightly larger than the other. 
  • Turn the smaller box upside down and glue the larger box on top of it, with the opening at the top.  
  • Cut the two small flaps at either end of the large box into triangles - these will be the shape of the roof (the gables).
  • Put glue along the side of the triangles and press the longer flaps against them. Hold these in place until they stick together.
  • Take a sheet of cardboard, fold it in half lengthways and place this over the flaps of the top box to create a roof. Make sure there's a slight overlap on each side, and trim it if the overlap is too big. Glue it in place once you've cut it to the right size.  
  • Now paint the house white (you might need two coats) and paint the roof brown.
  • Once the paint has dried, draw on the wooden beams, windows and roof tiles with a black felt-tip pen, and use a brown felt-tip pen to draw the door. 
  • To make your house unique, you could add flowers growing outside or people at the windows.

Art

1. Bucket List Art

A Bucket list is a list of a things you would like to do in a certain amount of time. Looking to next year, we would like you to think of some things that you would like to complete. You could include some of the following ideas:

  • Reading a specific book
  • Going on a hike
  • Running the Great North Run
  • Going to see a movie
  • Learning a new language
  • Go to the beach

Use the examples to create a colourful bucket list in the shape of a bucket. Include illustrations and labels to show what they are.

2. Primary School Memories

Sketch out four different designs that include the word 'memories' and different images to represent your memories. Once you have finished, choose your favourite design to draw.

 

Use bright colours and symbols to represent your favourite memories from this year and your time in primary school. It could be your favourite subject, a lesson that has stood out, a book that we have read or a sport that you have taken part in. You can also include patterns to show your art skills.

3. Marker Print Artwork

To create a marker print you’ll need a plastic surface; greaseproof paper is an excellent option.

 

First, use washable markers or water colours to create a design on the greaseproof paper. This is a nice time to review colour mixing.

 

Once the transparency is coated with marker, spritz it with water. The markers will instantly transform into watercolours and start mixing. Place a piece of paper onto the wet transparency to create a print.

 

To take it up a notch, create a drawing with permanent marker on their printing paper first. Here, the permanent marker design will remain intact as the printed image gets layered on top.

 

PE

1. HIIT Workout

20 seconds of star jumps,

10 seconds rest,

20 seconds of spotty dogs,

10 seconds rest,

20 seconds of lie down stand up,

10 seconds rest,

20 seconds of sit-ups,

30 seconds rest.

 

30 star jumps,

20 seconds rest,

30 seconds of spotty dogs,

20 seconds rest,

30 seconds of lie down stand up,

20 seconds rest,

30 seconds of sit-ups,

30 seconds rest.

 

40 seconds star jumps,

20 seconds rest,

40 seconds spotty dogs,

20 seconds rest,

40 seconds of lie down stand up,

20 seconds rest,

40 seconds of sit-ups,

30 seconds rest.

 

50 seconds of star jumps,

30 seconds rest,

50 seconds of spotty dogs,

30 seconds rest,

50 seconds of lie down stand up,

30 seconds rest,

50 seconds of sit-ups,

60 seconds rest.

 

60 seconds of star jumps,

30 seconds rest,

60 seconds of spotty dogs,

30 seconds rest,

60 seconds lie down stand ups,

30 seconds rest,

60 seconds of sit-ups

Week Commencing 06.07.2020

30 Minute Family Workout

English

 

1. Comparisons Between Two Settings

Watch the clip from Mary Poppins. While watching the video, write down words to describe both of the settings. Using the images, write 6 sentences in each row to describe the settings.

Write a short extract that describes Mary Poppins, Bert and the children travelling from one setting to another. Use the example to help you.

 

Standing on the grey dusty pavement, Mary and Bert decided what to do with their day. The sky turned grey as the fog descended over the trees; it had been raining earlier. Bert’s chalk drawings were scattered across the busy street as people walked passed ignoring their beauty. Black steel railings surrounded the park and royal fountain. Mary stepped over the paintings with authority and grabbed the children’s hands. “1.2.3.” Mary counted. Suddenly the four figures jumped into the painting…

 

Birds were tweeting merrily as the sun shone down on the fresh, emerald grass. Fluffy clouds occupied the sky; it was such a beautiful day. Mary, Bert and the children appeared on the top of a hill, overlooking the mesmerising scenery. They were dressed in clean pastel clothing.

2. Mary Poppins Park Scene

Watch the video clip from previous lesson and make notes of the events within the story.

Create a brief story plan for the film clip.

Write your extract based on the park scene of Mary Poppins. Use the success criteria to include techniques from your year 6 targets.

3. Plan Own Mary Poppins Story

Today you are going to be writing your own Mary Poppins adventure story. Watch the movie clips to develop an understanding of the different adventures that she goes on.

When planning your story, you need to decide where Mary Poppins is going to take the children on their adventure. Think about the following questions?

  • Where are they going?
  • Where did they travel from?
  • How did they travel there?
  • What did they do when they got there?
  • Does their appearance change?

Plan your story using the template below.

4. Mary Poppins Story

Over two sessions, you are going to write your Mary Poppins adventure story.

 

Recap from previous lesson by reading through your story plan.

 

Use the story map to help you form your setting description. Remember you need to include exciting vocabulary in your adventure story.

Watch the video on BBC Bitesize to understand how to write an adventure story.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/zx339j6/articles/zgthrwx

Use the success criteria to write your Mary Poppins adventure story.

Maths

 

1. Algebra- Using Formulas

Watch the video to recap what we mean by algebra.

Algebra is just like a puzzle where we start with something like "x − 2 = 4" and we want to end up with something like "x = 6". But instead of saying, "Obviously x=6," use this step-by-step approach:

 

  • Work out what to remove to get "x = ..."
  • Remove it by doing the opposite (adding is the opposite of subtracting)
  • Do that to both sides

 

Example

x – 2 = 4

x = 4 + 2 (move the 2 to the other side and do the inverse)

x = 6

 

x + 5 = 12

x = 12 – 5 (move the 5 to the other side and do the inverse)

x = 7

 

What is a formula?

A formula is a fact or rule that uses mathematical symbols.

It will usually have an equals sign (=) and two or more variables (x, y, etc) that stand in for values we don't know yet. A formula shows us how things are related to each other.

 

The rule for this sequence is ‘add 3 each time’.

 

5, ?, ?, ?

 

To answer this question, you need to add on 3 each time to complete the sequence.

 

5,  8,  11,  14

 

Here is a sequence and you need to circle the next term (number) in the sequence.

 

256,  231,  206,  ?

 

These are the options you have to choose from.

191          181          182         192

 

To answer this question, you need to work out the formula they have used for the sequence. You need to find the difference between 256, 231 and 206; this will tell you the formula for the sequence which you can then use to find the next number in the sequence.

 

Complete the reasoning challenges in the documents below.

Name
 Green Using Formulas.pdfDownload
 Pink Using Formulas.pdfDownload
 Yellow Using Formulas.pdfDownload
Showing 1-3 of 3

2. Algebra- Missing Number Equations

Watch Miss Walker’s videos below to recap the methods we use to find the missing numbers in equations.

Solve the equations below by finding the value of the missing numbers. Once you have completed the questions, solve the reasoning challenges in the documents underneath.

Name
 Green Equations Reasoning.pdfDownload
 Pink Equations Reasoning.pdfDownload
 Yellow Equations Reasoning.pdfDownload
Showing 1-3 of 3

3. Algebra- Two Step Equations

Watch Miss Walker’s video below to recap how to solve equations with two steps to them.

Solve the equations below by finding the value of the missing numbers. Once you have completed the questions, solve the reasoning challenges in the documents underneath.

Name
 Green Two-Step Equations.pdfDownload
 Yellow Two-Step Equations.pdfDownload
Showing 1-2 of 2

4. Algebra Reasoning

Look over your work from this week to recap what you have learned about algebra. Answer the following questions.

  • If a = 1, what is 2a + 9?
  • If b = 6, what is 3b + 4?
  • 2c + 4 = 20
    What is the value of c?
  • 7d + 6 = 27
    What is the value of d?

 

Complete the algebra reasoning questions in the documents below. Make sure you write out the question in your book.

Name
 Green Algebra Reasoning.pdfDownload
 Pink Algebra Reasoning.pdfDownload
 Yellow Algebra Reasoning.pdfDownload
Showing 1-3 of 3

5. Algebra Reasoning

Look over your work from this week to recap what you have learned about algebra. Answer the following questions.

  • If e = 6, what is 3e + 27?
  • If f = 8, what is 8f + 9?
  • 7g - 5 = 30
    What is the value of g?
  • 5h + 2 = 52
    What is the value of h?

 

Complete the algebra reasoning questions in the documents below. Make sure you write out the question in your book.

Name
 Green Algebra Reasoning.pdfDownload
 Pink Algebra Reasoning.pdfDownload
 Yellow Algebra Reasoning.pdfDownload
Showing 1-3 of 3

Art

 

1. Tudor Coats of Arms

Read the information sheets below about the Tudor Coats of Arms. You are going to design, draw and colour your own family crest or Coat of Arms. Look at the Heraldic Language sheet to choose which patterns, animals and colours best suit you.

Draw them carefully inside the Heraldic Shield and then colour them using the correct colours. You will then have made your very own family Coat of Arms.

2. Tudor Portraits

Portraits are drawings, paintings or photographs of a person’s face and expression. In the Tudor period, portraits were very popular amongst the noble families. Having your portrait painted was a sign of nobility and wealth. A portrait can be powerful because they show an image you want to give of yourself. They say the camera never lies but someone could paint whatever they wanted/were told to paint. 

 

Use the guide below and the information about the Tudor monarchs (underneath the guide) to draw a Tudor portrait of a historical figure from the Tudor period.

History

 

1. Tudor Explorers

Today, you are going to be learning about a famous Tudor explorer called Sir Francis Drake. Watch the video below and read the information sheets provided to learn more about his role as an explorer.

Name
 A Summary of the Spanish Armada.pdfDownload
 Sir Francis Drake Information Sheet.pdfDownload
 Sir Francis Drake Information.pdfDownload
Showing 1-3 of 3

Drake was an Elizabethan sailor and navigator.

  • His occupation was an explorer and privateer
  • Born in 1540 in Tavistock, England
  • Died in January 27, 1596 in Portobello, Panama
  • Best known as the first Englishman to sail around the world and defeating the Spanish Armada

 

History has recorded Sir Francis Drake as an English hero who saved the country from a Spanish invasion. However, in recent years, his privateering antics have also led to him being called a common pirate. Use the information sheets, your own research and the template below to explain why some people may record Sir Francis Drake as a hero and some may record him as a pirate. Once you have completed the two sides of the argument, write a conclusion explaining whether you would record him as a hero or a pirate. Make sure you use evidence to justify your opinions.

2. Tudor Society

From about 1450, a new type of evidence- called an inventory- was created to document the possessions left in a person’s home when they died. This allows us to investigate the possessions and analyse what they tell us about the people who lived there. When someone died, whether they were rich or poor, a clerk made an inventory (a list) of everything they owned and what was in their house. The inventories, which have survived, are very useful to us. Reading an inventory is like looking around someone’s house just as they left it hundreds of years ago.

 

TASK ONE- Read the information provided and match the inventories to the correct family. Once you have matched the cards up, you need to analyse the inventories, using your inference skills, and answer the questions underneath.

  • Pick one family and explain
  • Who were they? / What did they do?
  • What were their houses like? (What was in them?)
  • What did they eat?

2) Compare the three inventories

  • Which had the best standard of living? (Who is rich and who is poor?)
  • Support your answer with specific details (quotes from the sources)

 

TASK TWO- Research these four areas of Tudor society and make notes about the information you find.

  • Jobs
  • Food
  • Clothing
  • Homes

You will be using this research in tomorrow’s lesson as you will be comparing life in Tudor England to life in today’s society. Therefore, it is important that you research this in-depth as it will help you complete your tasks tomorrow.

Name
 Tudor Inventories.pdfDownload
Showing 1-1 of 1

3. Tudor Homes

Today, you are going to be using your work from yesterday to compare life in Tudor England to life in today’s society. For each of the areas you researched yesterday, you will complete a Venn diagram to compare that aspect of society in Tudor England to today’s society. In the documents below are the Venn diagrams you can use to complete this task. Remember that you can also draw out the template to use.

Name
 Comparing Tudor Clothing and Our Clothing.pdfDownload
 Comparing Tudor Food and Our Food.pdfDownload
 Comparing Tudor Homes and Our Homes.pdfDownload
 Comparing Tudor Jobs and Our Jobs.pdfDownload
Showing 1-4 of 4

PE

 

1. HIIT Workout

20 seconds of star jumps,

10 seconds rest,

20 seconds of spotty dogs,

10 seconds rest,

20 seconds of lie down stand up,

10 seconds rest,

20 seconds of sit-ups,

30 seconds rest.

 

30 star jumps,

20 seconds rest,

30 seconds of spotty dogs,

20 seconds rest,

30 seconds of lie down stand up,

20 seconds rest,

30 seconds of sit-ups,

30 seconds rest.

 

40 seconds star jumps,

20 seconds rest,

40 seconds spotty dogs,

20 seconds rest,

40 seconds of lie down stand up,

20 seconds rest,

40 seconds of sit-ups,

30 seconds rest.

 

50 seconds of star jumps,

30 seconds rest,

50 seconds of spotty dogs,

30 seconds rest,

50 seconds of lie down stand up,

30 seconds rest,

50 seconds of sit-ups,

60 seconds rest.

 

60 seconds of star jumps,

30 seconds rest,

60 seconds of spotty dogs,

30 seconds rest,

60 seconds lie down stand ups,

30 seconds rest,

60 seconds of sit-ups

2. Pilates Workout

3. Abs Workout

Week Commencing 29.06.2020

English

 

1. Description of Statues and Personification

Watch video to find out about imagery and personification

TASK ONE:

Write a sentence that includes personification for each object.

TASK TWO:

Watch video of Dracula’s Whitby

https://www.literacyshed.com/draculas-whitby.html

 

Write a paragraph for each statue that includes imagery and personification. Use the example to help you.

 

The moon light shone over the towering statue. He watched over the vast number of crowded graves, pointing with authority. Streams of ivy crawled up the ancient carving. A small square plinth supported the stone figure. His mysterious face was covered by the ever-growing darkness. Grey clouds surrounded the sculpture and the gloomy abbey loomed in the distance.

2. Emotions Graph

Recap from previous lesson and watch video of Dracula’s Whitby. https://www.literacyshed.com/draculas-whitby.html

 

While watching the video, make a note of any thoughts and emotions that the person would be feeling as the are walking around the abbey.

 

Order these events in chronological order:

 

  • Discovering the reflection of the statue is a skeleton
  • Approaching the abbey
  • Walking up the dusty path
  • Travelling through a narrow corridor
  • Looking out to sea at a ship
  • Standing outside in the ruins of the abbey
  • Looking out to a graveyard
  • Standing in front of a pointing statue
  • Entering the flooded cellar
  • Standing in front of a creepy statue
  • The ceiling breaks and falls to the ground
  • Standing at the altar
  • Walking through the steel gates of the entrance
  • Walking past a curved tree and lanterns

 

TASK: Create an emotion graph to show how the person is feeling throughout the video. Remember to experiment with more advanced vocabulary. Don’t use sad, happy or scared. Use the guide that is not related to the story to help you. 

Once you have drawn your emotions graph, write an emotion next to each plot. Remember to make them more interesting than sad, happy, scared.

3. First Person Story

Read through your work from previous lesson.

Watch the video https://www.literacyshed.com/draculas-whitby.html

 

TASK: You are going to write a 1st person story from the perspective of the person in the video.

 

What are the features of 1st person account?

  • 1st person (I, me, my, we)
  • Chronological Order
  • Paragraphs
  • Time connectives
  • Thoughts and feelings
  • Show not Tell method

Watch the videos below to see examples of how to use the show not tell method. 

Use the example to help you:

The warmth of the evening sun gave way to silvery half-light as the moon rose above the houses. Clouds scudded across the hazy sky. I walked quickly; I was late tonight and wanted to be at home, safe and warm in my cosy house. I heard a noise behind me. It was only faint but there was definitely something there. I quickened my pace aware that I was on my own with no one to call out to or ask for help. The noise became louder; it was the sound of heavy footsteps behind me. I was running now, running blindly through the darkness. My heart was pounding. My mouth was dry with fear.

 

I felt the rush of the wind as a figure passed me then stopped and turned to face me. A thin, bony hand reached out towards me. I heard a scream rise from deep within me but it made no sound; fear had taken over. I was paralysed, chilled to my very soul with the sight of the horrific face in front of me. Suddenly…

 

Ensure you are including the techniques within the success criteria in your work. 

4. Story Plan

Begin by reading the text below.

 

Screaming the crowd cheered with excitement! Even though it was foggy, this year’s skateboard competition was guaranteed to be unbelievably exciting! Especially, since Bobby was one of the celebrity skaters! Animated, the crowd pulsated with eagerness at the sight of Bobby at the top of the half pipe. Focused, the young skater took one deep breath and kicked his skateboard down the steep slope – crouching low to gain speed. Speeding up the other side, the pro-skater flipped into the air and spiralled back down towards the slope! Unbelievable! What was his next trick going to be? With the crowd roaring ever louder, Bobby prepared for his next summersault. The fog was much thicker now and it sat just above the half pipe like a haze of smoke. Bobby flipped straight into the air and spiralled upwards. Yelling with joy, the hordes of people briefly lost sight of the skater waiting for him to come rushing back down to the half pipe. Moments passed, but there was no sign of Bobby. Where had he gone? The crowd went silent. Still no sight. AHHHHHHHH! A scream from one member of the audience echoed through the venue, as a shadowy figure appeared through the fog at the top of the half pipe. But this was not Bobby… this was a ghostly figure!

Plan a first-person story based on the text and images. Who are you going to be when writing the account?

  • Bobby the skater
  • An audience member

 

Use the key to plan your story.

5. Write your own first person story

Recap from previous lesson by reading through your story plan.

 

Use the story to help you form your setting description. Remember you need to build tension by creating atmosphere.

Screaming the crowd cheered with excitement! Even though it was foggy, this year’s skateboard competition was guaranteed to be unbelievably exciting! Especially, since Bobby was one of the celebrity skaters! Animated, the crowd pulsated with eagerness at the sight of Bobby at the top of the half pipe. Focused, the young skater took one deep breath and kicked his skateboard down the steep slope – crouching low to gain speed. Speeding up the other side, the pro-skater flipped into the air and spiralled back down towards the slope! Unbelievable! What was his next trick going to be? With the crowd roaring ever louder, Bobby prepared for his next summersault. The fog was much thicker now and it sat just above the half pipe like a haze of smoke. Bobby flipped straight into the air and spiralled upwards. Yelling with joy, the hordes of people briefly lost sight of the skater waiting for him to come rushing back down to the half pipe. Moments passed, but there was no sign of Bobby. Where had he gone? The crowd went silent. Still no sight. AHHHHHHHH! A scream from one member of the audience echoed through the venue, as a shadowy figure appeared through the fog at the top of the half pipe. But this was not Bobby… this was a ghostly figure!

 

How do we build tension in a story?

  • short sentences
  • horror vocabulary
  • show not tell method

 

Use your plan from yesterday and the success criteria below to write your first person ghost story. 

Maths

 

Ratio- Percentages and Proportion

Watch the video below to recap how to find percentages of amounts.

A shop keeper has 60kg of potatoes. In one day, he sells 50% of the potatoes. How many kg of potatoes does he sell?

 First, we need to find 50% of 60kg. To find 50%, we half the number (divide by 2). 60÷ 2 = 30 so the answer is 30kg.

 

Complete the percentage reasoning challenges in the document below. 

Name
 Green Percentages and Proportion.pdfDownload
 Pink Percentages and Proportion.pdfDownload
 Yellow Percentages and Proportion.pdfDownload
Showing 1-3 of 3

Ratio- Unequal Sharing

A ratio shows how much of one thing there is compared to another. Ratios are usually written in the form a:b.

If you are making orange squash and you mix one part orange to four parts water, the ratio of orange to water will be 1:4 (1 to 4). The order in which a ratio is stated is important. Changing the order of the numbers in a ratio changes the proportions.

 

Example

When making a fruit salad, we need to know that the ratio of strawberries to oranges is 2:3. If we changed the order of this to oranges and strawberries, the ratio would be 3:2 as the statement asks for oranges first.

There are 48 beads in a jar. For every 2 purple beads there are 6 red beads. How many red beads are there altogether?

2 + 6 = 8 (add the two parts of the ratio together)

48 ÷ 8 = 6 (divide the total of beads by the number of parts in the ratio)

This will give you the value of each individual part of the ratio.

2 x 6 = 12 (multiply the purple beads ratio by the value of the individual parts)

6 x 6 = 36 (multiply the red beads ratio by the value of the individual parts)

Answer = There are 36 red beads in the jar.

 

There are 63 children in a playground. For every 2 children wearing blue trainers there are 5 children wearing black school shoes. How many children are wearing black school shoes?

2 + 5 = 7 (add the two parts of the ratio together)

63 ÷ 7 = 9 (divide the total number of children by the number of parts in the ratio)

2 x 9 = 18 (multiply the value of an individual part by the first part of the ratio)

5 x 9 = 45 (multiply the value of an individual part by the second part of the ratio)

Answer = 45 children are wearing black school shoes.

 

There are 20 children in a playground. The ratio of children playing football to tennis is 2:8. How many children are playing football?

2 + 8 = 10 (add the two parts of the ratio together)

20 ÷ 10 = 2 (divide the total number of children by the number of parts in the ratio)

2 x 2 = 4 (multiply the value of an individual part by the football part of the ratio)

8 x 2 = 16 (multiply the value of an individual part by the tennis part of the ratio)

Answer = 4 children are playing football.

 

David has 5 DVDs for every 2 that Tom has. David has 15 DVDs. How many does Tom have?

15 ÷ 5 = 3 (divide David’s total by his part of the ratio)            

3 x 2 = 6 (multiply Tom’s part of the ratio by the answer)

Answer = Tom has 6 DVDs

 

Write out the ratio word problems and solve underneath. Once you have completed your first task, complete the reasoning challenges that are included in the documents below.

Name
 Green Ratio Problems.pdfDownload
 Pink Ratio Problems.pdfDownload
 Yellow Ratio Problems.pdfDownload
Showing 1-3 of 3

3. Ratio- Converting Recipes

Watch the video below to recap how to scale ratios up and down using recipes as an example.

Scaling a recipe means that you are adjusting the ingredient quantities for a different amount of servings. While doubling or halving a recipe is relatively easy, you will need to do some calculations when you want to convert a six-serving recipe for two people or fourteen people. Whether you're increasing a recipe or decreasing it—the procedure for adjusting the ingredient quantities is the same.

 

Peanut butter biscuits

  • 175g butter
  • 50g peanut butter
  • 100g caster sugar
  • 100g soft brown sugar
  • 1 egg
  • 150g flour
  • ¼ teaspoon of salt

 

This recipe makes 36 peanut butter biscuits.

If I wanted to make 72 biscuits, I would need to double (x 2) the amount of each ingredient in the recipe as 36 x 2 = 72. Therefore, the new recipe for 72 biscuits would include the following amounts.

  • 350g butter
  • 100g peanut butter
  • 200g caster sugar
  • 200g soft brown sugar
  • 2 eggs
  • 300g flour
  • ½ teaspoon of salt

 

If I wanted to make 18 biscuits, I would need to work out the link between 18 and 36. The link is that 18 is half of 36. Therefore, I need to divide the quantities for 36 biscuits by 2 because 36 ÷ 2 = 18. The new recipe for 18 biscuits would include the following quantities.

  • 5g butter
  • 25g peanut butter
  • 50g caster sugar
  • 50g soft brown sugar
  • ½ an egg
  • 75g flour
  • 1/8 teaspoon of salt

 

If I wanted to make 9 biscuits, I would need to work out the link between 9 and 36. The link is 9 x 4 = 36. Therefore, I need to divide the quantities for 36 biscuits by 4 because 36 ÷ 4 = 9.

If I wanted to make 12 biscuits, I would need to find the link between 12 and 36 which is 12 x 3 = 36. Therefore, I need to divide the original quantities by 3 because 36 ÷ 3 = 12.

 

Complete the scaling recipes challenges in the documents below. Write out the question before solving it as you will be able to refer back to the recipes when completing the questions.

Name
 Green Recipes.pdfDownload
 Pink Recipes.pdfDownload
 Yellow Recipes.pdfDownload
Showing 1-3 of 3

4. Ratio- Scale Factors

When describing an enlargement, you must state by how much the shape has been enlarged. This is called the scale factor. For example, a scale factor of 2 means that the new shape is double the size of the original shape. When a scale factor is a fraction, the shape decreases in size, but we still call this an enlargement. So, a scale factor of ¼ means that the new shape is 4 times smaller than the original.

 

Watch the video below to learn more about using scale factors to draw shapes. Once you have watched the video, read through the examples underneath to make sure you understand how to use and find scale factor. 

 

Complete the scale factor reasoning challenges in the documents below. 

Name
 Green Scale Factor.pdfDownload
 Pink Scale Factor.pdfDownload
 Yellow Scale Factor.pdfDownload
Showing 1-3 of 3

5. Ratio Reasoning

Look over your work from this week to recap what you have learned about ratio and proportion. Answer the following questions.

 

  • Write one part orange squash to five parts water as a ratio.
  • There are 48 beads in a jar. For every 2 purple beads there are 6 red beads. How many red beads are there altogether?
  • What is a scale factor and how does it link to ratio and proportion?

 

Complete the ratio and proportion reasoning questions in the documents below. Make sure you write out the question in your book.

Name
 Green Ratio Reasoning.pdfDownload
 Pink Ratio Reasoning.pdfDownload
 Yellow Ratio Reasoning.pdfDownload
Showing 1-3 of 3

Science

 

1. Apple Oxidation

Apples can be a delicious snack as long as they are not brown. The inside of an apple usually has a delicious centre that is free from brown spots. The skin of the apple protects it from the oxygen in the air.

 

Oxidation

When an apple is cut, its flesh becomes unprotected. When the apple’s flesh meets the oxygen in the air, a chemical reaction called oxidation occurs. Oxidation causes the apple’s flesh to turn brown. Then, the fruit spoils. Oxidation makes the fruit spoil much faster that it normally would. Other fruits such as bananas, pears, and peaches can also become a victim of oxidation.

 

Preventing Oxidation

Oxidation can be avoided by covering the fruit with ascorbic acid. Ascorbic acid is another word for Vitamin C. Vitamin C can be found in many citrus fruits like oranges, grapefruit and lemons. It must be applied right after the fruit is cut in order to work.

 

TASK ONE: 

Write a definition of oxidation. 

What is the connection between ascorbic acid and oxidation?

 

 

Apple Oxidation Experiment

You are going to be testing different liquids on an apple to see which one prevents oxidation the best.

 

All the information you need to carry out the experiment is in the document below. 

2. Capillary Experiment

Capillary action is the process in which a liquid moves up something solid, like a tube or into a material with a lot of small holes. This happens when 3 forces called cohesion, adhesion, and surface tension work together. Water molecules are considered cohesive (sticky to each other) and they adhere (stick) to the paper towel. As one water molecule moves up the paper towel it pulls the other molecules with it. The molecules pull each other along like a drawstring.

 

Materials needed:

  • 7 glasses
  • Water
  • Red food colouring
  • Blue food colouring
  • Yellow food colouring
  • Kitchen roll

 

Method:

1. Start out by putting 7 glasses on the counter. Fill glasses 1, 3, 5, and 7 most of the way up with water.

2. Next, add food colouring to the glasses. 

  • 5-10 drops of red food colouring to glass 1 and 7
  • 15 drops of yellow food colouring to glass 3
  • 5-10 drops food colouring to glass 5

3. Your experiment set-up should look like the photo below.

4. Finally, take a paper towel and fold it in half width wise. Fold it again, and again, and again. Now put one side of the folded paper towel into one glass and the other side of the paper towel in the next glass. Repeat with the remaining cups.

 

5. Once your experiment is ready, observe what happens to the paper towel over time. Write a paragraph to explain what happened to the water and why.

Topic

 

1. Henry VIII's Family Tree

Watch the video from Horrible Histories and listen out for members of Henry VIII’s family. Make notes as you watch the video as you will be able to use these when creating the family tree.

 

Watch the second video carefully as it goes through Henry VIII’s family tree, starting with his parents- Henry VII and Elizabeth of York.

 

Using the information in the videos and your own research (if necessary), create a family tree for Henry VIII. The family tree should start with his parents, Henry VII and Elizabeth of York, and should include the following information.

  • Name
  • Year of birth- Year of death
  • Drawing of the person (images in the second video to help)

2. Henry VIII's Wives

Watch the song below from Horrible Histories to learn about Henry VIII’s six wives and their fate. This song will help you remember the order of the wives and what happened to them. The second video will give you information about each of the six wives as well as the dates they were married to Henry VIII.

 

You are going to write a mini fact file for each of Henry VIII’s wives (Catherine of Aragon, Anne Boleyn, Jane Seymour, Anne of Cleves, Catherine Howard and Catherine Parr). Each fact file should include the following information.

  • A drawing of the person
  • Dates showing the start and end of their marriage
  • Interesting facts about that person
  • Did they have any children?
  • What happened to them at the end of their marriage?

3. Why did Henry VIII marry six times?

Read the information sheet below to recap who were the six wives of Henry VIII.

 

Today, you are going to be deciding which of his wives was the most important to Henry VIII and why. Take on the role of Henry VIII when you are making your decision and consider what he would find important.

  • A male heir was crucial to continuing the royal line and securing the kingdom. It was probably the queen’s most fundamental responsibility.
  • Henry liked beautiful women. A desirable queen was an asset, and it was expected that a king of his stature should have an attractive wife.
  • Just being beautiful was not enough – Henry’s wives had to be loyal, trustworthy and faithful too.

 

These are just some of the points Henry considered when choosing his wife.

 

Once you have chosen the wife you think he would consider as the most important, create a presentation explaining your choice. Use evidence from your work this week and further research to justify and support your opinion. Your presentation could be in the style of a vlog, a speech, a poster or a PowerPoint presentation- the choice is yours!

Name
 Henry VIII's Six Wives Information Sheet.pdfDownload
Showing 1-1 of 1

PE

1. HIIT Workout

20 seconds of star jumps,

10 seconds rest,

20 seconds of spotty dogs,

10 seconds rest,

20 seconds of lie down stand up,

10 seconds rest,

20 seconds of sit-ups,

30 seconds rest.

 

30 star jumps,

20 seconds rest,

30 seconds of spotty dogs,

20 seconds rest,

30 seconds of lie down stand up,

20 seconds rest,

30 seconds of sit-ups,

30 seconds rest.

 

40 seconds star jumps,

20 seconds rest,

40 seconds spotty dogs,

20 seconds rest,

40 seconds of lie down stand up,

20 seconds rest,

40 seconds of sit-ups,

30 seconds rest.

 

50 seconds of star jumps,

30 seconds rest,

50 seconds of spotty dogs,

30 seconds rest,

50 seconds of lie down stand up,

30 seconds rest,

50 seconds of sit-ups,

60 seconds rest.

 

60 seconds of star jumps,

30 seconds rest,

60 seconds of spotty dogs,

30 seconds rest,

60 seconds lie down stand ups,

30 seconds rest,

60 seconds of sit-ups

2. Pilates Workout

3. Abs Workout

Week Commencing 22.06.2020

30 Minute Family Workout

English

1. Pere Lachaise – The First Time They Meet

Watch the video from the Literacy Shed and make notes of the characters within the story. 
https://www.literacyshed.com/pere-lachaise.html

 

TASK ONE

Answer the following questions:

  • Who are they?
  • When did they meet?
  • Where did they meet?
  • How did they meet?
  • Was there a significant event to make them meet?
  • What is their relationship?

TASK TWO

Write a short story to explain how the girl and Chopin first met. One idea could be that the was lost in the cemetery then heard quiet music and decided to investigate. How did she discover the ghost?

 

CHALLENGE: Use short sentences to build tension.

 

Use the example to help you:

 

The sky was black. The only sound that could be heard was from the young girl; she was breathing heavily. Stopping to catch her breath, she cast her eye over the vast number of crowded graves covering the entire area. It was eerie. Mist fell across the mossy ground. The young girl lifted her head in anticipation of moving off again. Suddenly, she heard a peculiar noise. It sounded like a piano. Curiosity had got the better of her and she edged towards the mysterious sound. Her palms began to sweat; the sound was getting louder. As she perched herself in a small bush, she peered through gaps in the leaves.

A slender figure was sat on a rickety stool. Their wrinkly, skinny fingers were moving like the speed of light as they tickled ivory piano keys. A huge crescendo filled the entire graveyard. The figure’s shoulders were filled with tension as the song came to an end. As the girl edged closer she lost her balance and cause a huge crash in the bush. The mysterious figure turned round and their eyes met for the first time.

2. Writing Dialogue Between Characters

What is dialogue used for? When do we see it? What punctuation is used for dialogue?

TASK ONE:

Rewrite the text and add the correct punctuation to this text. There is no punctuation whatsoever so you will have to include:

  • Capital letters
  • Full stops
  • Commas
  • Apostrophes
  • Speech marks
  • Semi colons
  • Brackets
  • Dashes

Remember the rules for punctuating speech.

 

 

Annie relaxed her grip on the horse and took a deep breath when she slowly let her breath out again she felt as if she had been holding it in ever since she left home

 

so annie said the horseman this is where I must leave you

 

come in cried annie im sure you can come in

 

yoi must go your wat and I mine said the horseman shaking his head and taking great care to stop his horse from putting so much as a hoof into the pool of light your sister and her baby will be alright

 

so annie swung down from the saddle and stood on the gravel feeling rather shaky she looked up at the man still unsmiling and sitting so still

 

thank you cried annie thank you I was so afraid she shook her head I was afraid of meeting the ghost

 

there was no fear of that said the horseman I am the ghost

TASK TWO:

 

Watch the video from previous lesson. 

https://www.literacyshed.com/pere-lachaise.html

Read through the story from yesterday, where the characters met for the first time. While watching the video, think about what the characters would have said to each other.

 

Write a section of dialogue that follows on from your story yesterday. What would the characters have said to each other?

Remember to include the correct punctuation for speech!

3. Building Tension

What are the features of horror stories?

  • Elements of surprise and shock.
  • Detailed descriptions to create a scary atmosphere.
  • Descriptions of how characters react to situations.
  • All seems well and then suddenly things go wrong.
  • Short sentences used for effect.

 

Why do we build tension in stories?

What techniques do we use to build tension?

  • Short sentences
  • Horror vocabulary
  • ‘Show not Tell’ method

TASK ONE:

Analyse the extracts from horror stories and highlight the techniques used to create and build tension.

Name
 Analysing Horror Extracts.pdfDownload
Showing 1-1 of 1

TASK TWO:

Write an extract from a horror story that focuses on creating and building tension.

4. Planning a Story

Watch the video from the Literacy Shed. 

https://www.literacyshed.com/pere-lachaise.html

 

TASK:

Plan a ghost story based on one of these settings. Which characters are you going to include?

How are you going to build tension?

 

  • The character does not realise that the person they are talking to is a ghost until the end of the story.
  • The setting is described using spooky vocabulary.
  • A spooky event does not happen until the end of the story, leaving it on a cliff hanger.

Use the template to create a plan for your spooky story.

Name
 Story Plan Template.pdfDownload
Showing 1-1 of 1

5. Ghost Story

Recap previous lesson by reading through plan of story. 

 

Use the success criteria to write a spooky story that builds tension. Remember to use the show not tell method in your writing to build tension.

  • Character movements
  • Character reactions
  • Character feelings and emotions
  • Short sentences for effect. 

Maths

1. Converting Between Units of Length

Use this link to watch a video recapping what the metric measurements are. Once you have watched the video, play the quiz at the bottom of the website.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/z4nsgk7/articles/zqf4cwx

 

The metric system is used to measure the length, weight or volume of an object. Length is measured in millimetres (mm), centimetres (cm), metres (m) or kilometres (km).

  • 1 cm = 10 mm
  • 1 m = 100 cm
  • 1 km = 1000 m
  • 1 cm is about the width of a staple
  • 1 m is about the width of a single bed

 

Watch the video below to recap the methods used to convert between different units of length. Once you have watched the video and are confident with using these methods, complete the work found in the documents below.

Name
 Green Length.pdfDownload
 Pink Length.pdfDownload
 Yellow Length.pdfDownload
Showing 1-3 of 3

2. Converting Between Units of Mass and Volume

Using your work from yesterday, recap the different units of length that we can use to measure the length of objects and distance. Today, you are going to be converting between the units we use when weighing objects; they are called grams and kilograms. You will also be converting between the units we use when measuring the volume of liquids; they are called millimetres and litres.

Watch the videos below to recap the methods we use to convert between units of mass and volume. Once you have watched the videos, complete the work in the documents below.

Name
 Green Mass and Volume.pdfDownload
 Pink Mass and Volume.pdfDownload
 Yellow Mass and Volume.pdfDownload
Showing 1-3 of 3

3. Reading Scales

Today, you are going to be reading a variety of scales and converting your answers into different units of measure. Watch the video below to recap how to read scales and how to work out the missing intervals on a scale.

Complete the reading scales work and reasoning challenges in the documents below.

Name
 Green Reading Scales.docxDownload
 Pink Reading Scales.docxDownload
 Yellow Reading Scales.docxDownload
Showing 1-3 of 3

4. Converting Between Units of Time

Answer the questions below.

  • How many seconds are there in 1 minute?
  • How many minutes are there in 1 hour?
  • How many hours are there in 1 day?
  • How many days are there in 1 week?
  • How many weeks are there in 1 month?
  • How many months are there in 1 year, 2 years and 3 years?

 

Watch the video below to recap how to convert between units of time. Once you have watched the video, complete the conversion work in the documents below.

Name
 Green Converting Units of Time.docxDownload
 Pink Converting Units of Time.docxDownload
 Yellow Converting Units of Time.docxDownload
Showing 1-3 of 3

5. Time Reasoning

Today, you are going to be completing reasoning challenges based on time. These questions may include answering questions about timetables so make sure you read the work carefully. Watch the video below as it goes through how to answer questions linked to a timetable.

Name
 Green Timetables.docxDownload
 Pink Timetables.docxDownload
 Yellow Timetables.docxDownload
Showing 1-3 of 3

Science

1. Plastic Pollution

Watch the video clip to find out how much plastic is in the ocean.

https://www.kidsagainstplastic.co.uk/how-much-plastic-is-in-our-oceans/ 

Activity Two

Create a persuasive poster to show people how plastic pollution affects wildlife. Include ways to stop plastic pollution from happening in the future.

Activity Three

Complete the plastic pollution quiz from the WWF.

Name
 Plastic Pollution Quiz.pdfDownload
Showing 1-1 of 1

2. Eco bricks

Watch the video clip to find out about a solution to plastic pollution.

An ecobrick is a building block made entirely from unrecyclable plastic. It’s created by filling a plastic bottle with clean, dry plastic until it’s packed tightly and can be used as a building block.

 

Ecobricks can be used in all sorts of sustainable building projects, which makes them a great way to dispose of plastic waste that would otherwise end up in landfill, and potentially, the ocean.

 

The plastic in an ecobrick is very durable and will never break down, making it an ideal building material. They’re used in developing countries to construct furniture and even buildings, and they’re also used in the UK to build children’s playgrounds.   

 

In South Africa there are many sustainable construction projects underway, including outdoor classrooms, community gardens and a composting toilet, and in Guatemala there are a number of schools built from the plastic bottle bricks.

 

Watch the video below to learn how to make an ecobrick. 

  1. Choose a bottle. Any size bottle will work as an ecobrick, but the average size tends to be between 500ml to 1.5l. You should also make sure that you’re using a bottle from a product that you use regularly – you don’t want to end up having to buy a plastic bottle just to make an ecobrick!
  2. Prepare your plastic. Any plastic that you put in your brick needs to be clean and dry – any dirt can lead to microbiological growth and methane forming inside your brick which can make the bottle bloat and the cap even pop off.
  3. Get a stick. You’ll need a stick to poke the plastic in your bottle down so you can fit as much as possible in!
  4. What not to put in your ecobrick. Remember – the things you put in your ecobrick can’t be recycled or won’t break down, so be sure not to include metal, paper, card, food waste or glass.
  5. Weigh your ecobrick. You need to make sure that your ecobrick is packed as tightly as possible to make it really strong. Bricks that are too soft can’t be used for building because they might not be robust enough. Plus, the more you fit in your bottle, the less plastic will be getting out into the environment! Obviously, the weight of your brick depends on the size of your bottle, but as a rough guide a 500ml bottle should weigh around 175g when its full, and a 1.5l bottle should weigh around 500g.
  6. Be careful not to overfill your brick. Although your brick should be packed full of plastic, it shouldn’t be pushing against the lid because it could end up making the lid come off.

 

Here are some of the items you can put in your brick:

  • Plastic bags
  • Photo paper
  • Crisp packets
  • Food containers
  • Straws
  • Plastic cutlery
  • Cling film
  • Plastic fruit and vegetable packaging
  • Polystyrene (or Styrofoam) – this is a petroleum-based product that can’t be recycled. Lots of products are made out of this including food containers and packaging.

Topic

1. Tudor Timeline

As we are starting our new history topic, you will be creating a timeline to document the main events from the Tudor period. This will give you an oversight of what happened during this period of British history. Watch the video below as this will introduce you to the Tudor reign.

Use this link to read a timeline which details the main events of the Tudor period from the Battle of Bosworth, in 1485, to the accession of James I in 1603. http://www.primaryhomeworkhelp.co.uk/tudors/timeline.htm

 

You are going to create your own timeline for the Tudor period by researching the main events in this period of history. For each event, you need to write the date, include a short summary and draw an image representing that event.

2. The Battle of Bosworth

Read through the timeline you created yesterday about the Tudor period. Consider the questions below.

  • How did the Tudor reign begin?
  • How long did the Tudor era last for?
  • Why did this era end?

Today, you are going to be learning about the Battle of Bosworth in more detail; this event allowed Henry VII (Henry Tudor) to become King of England and started the Tudor reign. Watch the videos below to learn more about this important battle.

 

Using the information in the videos and your own research, create a fact file about The Battle Bosworth and the importance of this historic event. Make sure your fact file is written in paragraphs and includes the following information.

  • Introduction
  • What was the War of the Roses and why was this important?
  • What led to the Battle of Bosworth?
  • What happened during the Battle of Bosworth?
  • The Impact of the Battle of Bosworth

3. Who was Henry VIII?

Henry VIII was born at Greenwich Palace, London, on 28th June 1491 and was the second son of Henry VII and Elizabeth of York (daughter of Edward IV). He became Prince of Wales and heir to the throne on the death of his elder brother, Prince Arthur, in 1502. Henry VIII is probably the most well-known of the Tudor kings. He was a very selfish person and by the end of his life everyone was afraid of him, mainly because of his ruthless behaviour toward anyone who didn’t agree with him.

 

Use the link below to learn more about who Henry VIII was.

http://www.primaryhomeworkhelp.co.uk/tudors/kings/henry8.htm

 

TASK ONE:

Write a paragraph explaining who Henry VIII was and why he is an important historical figure. 

 

TASK TWO:

Analyse the portraits of Henry VIII below by looking for the following information. 

  • How is his personality portrayed in each portrait?
  • Why did he have different styles of portraits created?
  • What do we learn about Henry VIII from each portrait?

Write a paragraph explaining the information that the portraits provide about Henry VIII's personality and how he wanted to be portrayed to his country. 

PE

 

1. HIIT Workout

20 seconds of star jumps,

10 seconds rest,

20 seconds of spotty dogs,

10 seconds rest,

20 seconds of lie down stand up,

10 seconds rest,

20 seconds of sit-ups,

30 seconds rest.

 

30 star jumps,

20 seconds rest,

30 seconds of spotty dogs,

20 seconds rest,

30 seconds of lie down stand up,

20 seconds rest,

30 seconds of sit-ups,

30 seconds rest.

 

40 seconds star jumps,

20 seconds rest,

40 seconds spotty dogs,

20 seconds rest,

40 seconds of lie down stand up,

20 seconds rest,

40 seconds of sit-ups,

30 seconds rest.

 

50 seconds of star jumps,

30 seconds rest,

50 seconds of spotty dogs,

30 seconds rest,

50 seconds of lie down stand up,

30 seconds rest,

50 seconds of sit-ups,

60 seconds rest.

 

60 seconds of star jumps,

30 seconds rest,

60 seconds of spotty dogs,

30 seconds rest,

60 seconds lie down stand ups,

30 seconds rest,

60 seconds of sit-ups

2. Pilates Workout

3. Abs Workout

Week Commencing 15.06.2020

English

 

This week, you are going to be writing explanation texts. We have looked at this genre of writing throughout the year; however, there is a video below to remind you what explanation texts are.

1. Wish Fountain Machine

Watch the video below with a focus on how the wish fountain works.

Once you have watched the video, consider the following points.

  • How does the machine work?
  • What are the different parts that form the contraption?
  • What are the technical names of the different parts of the machine?

 

Today, you are going to be drawing the inside of the wish fountain machine and annotating your sketch with technical vocabulary linked to the different parts of the contraption. Your drawing will be of the machine, which is under the fountain in the video clip. For technical vocabulary, consider the terminology professionals would use when discussing the contraption. There are some examples below of the technical vocabulary you could annotate your drawing with.  

2. Wish Fountain Plan

Recap how the wish fountain machine works and the different parts of the contraption. Today, you are going to be planning your explanation text about the wish fountain by drawing a step-by-step guide about how it works. Your plan needs to include an image for each part of the process and an explanation underneath about that particular element.

 

Challenge- Above the arrows, write an example of a causal conjunction to link the sections together. There are some examples below.

3. Wish Fountain Explanation Text

Look over your plan from yesterday’s lesson to recap how the machine works. Today, you are going to be writing your explanation text about the wish granting contraption. Watch the video below to remind yourself of the features of an explanation text as you will need to include these in your work.

When writing your explanation text, make sure you include the following features in your work.

4. Wish Device

Today, you are going to be creating your own machine that will grant wishes. Consider the following points before drawing your contraption.

  • How does the customer grant the wish?
  • How will the wish be granted?
  • What different parts will the machine have?
  • What are the roles of the different parts of the machine?

 

In your book, draw your wish granting device and annotate with technical vocabulary to describe the different parts of the machine.

5. Wish Machine Explanation Text

Look over your annotated diagram from yesterday’s lesson to recap how your wish granting machine works. Explain to someone in your house how your machine works to make sure you have all the steps in the correct order.

 

Today, you are going to be writing your explanation text about your wish granting contraption. Watch the video below to remind yourself of the features of an explanation text as you will need to include these in your work.

When writing your explanation text, make sure you include the following features in your work.

Maths

1. Area and Perimeter

The area of a shape is the amount of surface it covers. It is measured in squares, usually square metres (m2) or square centimetres (cm2).

The perimeter of a shape is the distance around its edges. It is a length and is measured in units of length such as centimetres and metres.

 

The area and perimeter of a rectangle can be found using the following formulae:

Area = length x width

Perimeter = 2( length + width)

Name
 Area and Perimeter Challenges.pdfDownload
 Green Area and Perimeter.pdfDownload
 Pink Area and Perimeter.pdfDownload
 Yellow Area and Perimeter.pdfDownload
Showing 1-4 of 4

2. Different Areas and Perimeters

Some rectangles can have the same perimeter but a different area and vice versa. After watching the video, complete the tasks below. 

Name
 Green Task.pdfDownload
 Pink Task.pdfDownload
 Yellow Task.pdfDownload
Showing 1-3 of 3

3. Volume of Cubes and Cuboids

Finding the volume of a 3D shape is like finding the area but adding an extra step on.

The volume of a cube or cuboid is the length x breadth x height.

Complete the tasks below by finding the volume of the given shapes and answering the reasoning challenges. 

Name
 Green Task.pdfDownload
 Pink Task.pdfDownload
 Yellow Task.pdfDownload
Showing 1-3 of 3

4. Area and Perimeter of Parallelograms and Triangles

The area of a triangle is the base times the height and then divide it by two. 

The area of a parallelogram is the base times the height.

Name
 Green Task.pdfDownload
 Pink Task.pdfDownload
 Reasoning Challenges.pdfDownload
 Yellow Task.pdfDownload
Showing 1-4 of 4

5. Area and Perimeter Reasoning

TASK ONE- Write a definition for:

Area=

Perimeter=

Volume=

 

TASK TWO- Complete the following reasoning challenges. 

Name
 Green Challenges.pdfDownload
 Pink Reasoning.pdfDownload
 Yellow Challenges.pdfDownload
Showing 1-3 of 3

Science

At school this week, we are having a science focus week and our theme is 'Sea Life and Plastic Pollution' as part of the whole school theme of 'Our Diverse Planet'. For this week, we would like you to keep a diary of all the plastic items that you and your family use at home. Fill out the plastic diary below as we will be using this later in the week. 

 

1. Layers of the Ocean

Watch the video below to learn about the five layers of the ocean. 

The ocean has five different and distinct layers that each have their own unique characteristics. The layers range from the surface layer where most ocean activities occur, to the deep dark depths of the water that have yet to be fully explored. The deep layers have unique sea creatures, freezing temperatures, and high pressure. With the advancement in technology, scientists are hopeful that the oceanic depths will be explored thoroughly. As the depth increases, the temperature, light, and sea life decreases. Below is a summary of the ocean's 5 layers.

 

Read through the information sheet to learn about the five different layers of the ocean.

  • Sunlight Layer
  • Twilight Layer
  • Midnight Layer
  • Abyss Layer
  • Trench Layer

 

TASK ONE- Your first task is to represent the different layers of the ocean using household ingredients and a plastic bottle. Follow the instructions below to make your layers of the ocean. Keep checking the school Facebook page where we would love to see your layers of the ocean bottles!

TASK TWO- Your task is to draw the animals that live in each layer of the ocean using the template below. Remember that you can draw out the template to fill in. Make sure there are distinct layers in your diagram and include a label for each layer. Try to include as many sea creatures and sea life as possible.

Name
 Layers of the Ocean Blank Diagram.pdfDownload
 Layers of the Ocean Information.pdfDownload
 The Layers of the Ocean Information.pdfDownload
Showing 1-3 of 3

2. Make Your Own Coral Reef

Corals are animals that live in colonies of identical polyps and belong to the phylum Cnidaria, which also contains jellyfish, anemones, and hydra. There are two types of corals: soft coral and hard coral.

Watch the video below to learn about coral reefs.

Corals are animals that live in colonies of identical polyps and belong to the phylum Cnidaria, which also contains jellyfish, anemones, and hydra. There are two types of corals: soft coral and hard coral. Hard corals are important reef builders that can be found in tropical oceans. They are called hard corals because they can extract a mineral from the ocean called calcium carbonate to form a hard skeleton. When hard corals die, the hard skeletons remain intact. Soft corals do not have a hardened calcium carbonate skeleton; therefore, they do not contribute to the growth of coral reefs. 

 

Within hard corals are tiny, marine algae called zooxanthellae (pronounced zoo-zan-THELL-ee). These plant-like organisms capture sunlight and convert it to energy in a process called photosynthesis. The zooxanthellae and hard corals have a mutually beneficial relationship, meaning that both the algae and the coral benefit from one another. The corals provide protection for the zooxanthellae and the zooxanthellae provide nutrient sugars for the coral. 

 

Corals and zooxanthellae are sensitive organisms that require specific conditions to thrive, including the right temperature and water chemistry. Global warming and ocean acidification are two major threats to coral reef ecosystems. When ideal conditions are not met, zooxanthellae will die or leave their coral host in a process called bleaching.  Bleached corals do not die right away, but they are more likely to die of starvation or disease. 

 

To understand how to conserve and protect reefs, Virginia Aquarium biologists work with SECORE, an organization dedicated to conserving corals by developing new methods to assist coral reproduction in the wild. Ongoing projects at the Virginia Aquarium include fostering a coral nursery from sustainably harvested coral and maintaining an aquarium with hard and soft corals in 10,000-gallon aquarium. Grow your own crystal coral reef in this fun activity!

 

You will need:

  • Warm Water (adult supervision required)
  • Heatproof container (Mug, bowl, or dish)
  • Lollypop sticks
  • Pipe cleaners
  • Spoon
  • Sugar (Borax or salt can also be used)

 

Instructions

  1. Glue two popsicle sticks into an “X” shape. Make one per “coral”. This will be the stand for the crystals when they’re finished forming and ready to be displayed.
  2. Bend and twist colourful pipe cleaners to form coral shapes.
  3. Prepare solution: • Add 3 tablespoons of sugar, salt, or borax PER cup of warm water. • Stir the solution carefully until as much solute dissolves as possible. • If there are no particles left on the bottom of the container, add another tablespoon and stir. • Keep adding and stirring until none of the solute will dissolve into the water. • Optional: Food colouring can be added to the solution at this stage to add colour to the crystals.
  4. Insert your pipe cleaner coral into the container so that it is upside down. See picture.
  5. Move the container to a location that is out of the way and will not be disturbed for the next 24 hours.

Over the next few hours, the sugar, salt, or borax molecules will start to settle onto the pipe cleaner corals as the liquid cools. After 24 hours, remove the corals from the solution and allow them to dry. If you want larger crystals, place your coral back into the solution for another 24 hours. If you want to continue growing the crystal corals after two days, make another solution using step 3 and place the crystal coral inside. Just make sure that you will be able to remove the large coral from the container once the additional crystals have formed!

3. Animals in the Ocean

Today, you are going to be learning about food chains and webs in the oceans. Watch the video below to recap what food chains are.

After watching the video, answer the questions below.

  • What is a predator?
  • What is prey?
  • What is the difference between producers and consumers?

Watch the video below to learn about food chains in the ocean.

You are going to make a coral reef food chain mobile to show the link between predators and prey.

 

You will need:

  • 5 x A4 pieces of paper or card
  • 2 pieces of twigs or wooden skewers (with pointed ends removed) about 20cm long
  • 1m of string or wool
  • Glue
  • Scissors
  • Sellotape
  • Colouring pencils

 

Instructions

  1. Draw and colour in the living things below on the separate pieces of paper or card.
  • Seagrass
  • Phytoplankton
  • Parrotfish
  • Tiger shark
  • Green turtle
  • Sun
  • Manta ray
  • Copepod
  • Staghorn coral
  1. On the back of each card, write the name of the living thing and a short description. You may need to research them to find out information to include in your description.
  2. Use the template below for the coral food chain mobile to help you lay out your cards and twigs, before you attach them together with string.
  3. Once you are sure you have the correct order, you can use the tape to stick lengths of string to each card and then to the pieces of twigs.
  4. Once completed, don’t forget to stick a piece of string to the sun so you can hang your coral mobile up at home.

4. Life Cycles

In the life cycle of the Pacific salmon, nature recycles the parents to feed the babies. Mature salmon leave the Pacific Ocean as saltwater fish, never again to eat as they battle their way up the Columbia River to spawn in the home stream where they were born. Those born in the upper reaches of the Columbia River's tributary stream, the Snake River, travel more than 1,000 miles inland to lay their eggs and fertilize them, roughly one fourth of the distance across the United States. Without enough reserves in their bodies to get back to the Pacific, the adult fish spawn and die. To spawn, a female salmon scoops a nest in stream-bottom gravel by waving her tail and deposits her eggs in the hole. The male releases milt (sperm) into the water that covers the eggs and fertilizes them. Then the female brushes gravel over the eggs, and both parents lie exhausted in the stream until they die. Microorganisms in the water decompose their bodies during the winter, and this process increases the population of microorganisms in the stream. Come spring, the salmon eggs hatch into the tiny fish called "fry," whose first food is the microorganisms in the stream.

 

The Pacific salmon never see their parents, but are nourished by their decomposed bodies. When they grow large enough to be "fingerlings," the young salmon make the dangerous trip downstream, past dams and waterfalls to the ocean. There they grow into adults, averaging six pounds in weight. In its life cycle, the Pacific salmon takes five forms and sizes: a pea-sized egg, one-half-inch embryo, one- to three-inch fry, four- to five-inch fingerling, and fully grown, six-pound adult one to two feet long. Nature fully recycles Pacific salmon. (Atlantic Salmon, in contrast, travel up rivers only 150 to 250 miles long and can return to the sea after spawning.)

 

 

Watch the video to find out more about the life cycle of a pacific salmon

TASK ONE- Use the template to create the life cycle of a salmon in the correct order. Draw illustrations to match the correct stage.

  • Fry in the home stream
  • Fingerlings travelling downstream
  • Embryo in the stream gravel
  • Adults in the ocean and travelling back upstream
  • Eggs in the stream gravel

TASK TWO- Research another life cycle for another animal and create your own diagram.

5. Plastic Pollution

Look at your plastic diary from this week and analyse your results.

 

TASK ONE- Create a line graph for each of the different types of plastic below (these are taken from your diary).  

  • Plastic bags
  • Plastic bottles
  • Plastic drinking straws
  • Plastic food wrappers and packets
  • Yoghurt pots and other food containers

 

When drawing your line graph, the x axis (horizontal line) will be the days of the week and the y axis (vertical line) will be the amounts used. In total, you will have five line graphs to show your usage of each type of plastic over one week.

 

 

Watch the videos below to learn about what plastic pollution is and how we can reduce the amount we use in our lives.

 

TASK TWO- Using the information in the videos and your own research, create a presentation about what plastic pollution is, how it affects the sea life in the oceans, and how we can try to stop plastic pollution from happening. Your presentation could be in the style of a vlog, a speech, a poster or a PowerPoint presentation.

PE

1. HIIT Workout

20 seconds of star jumps,

10 seconds rest,

20 seconds of spotty dogs,

10 seconds rest,

20 seconds of lie down stand up,

10 seconds rest,

20 seconds of sit-ups,

30 seconds rest.

 

30 star jumps,

20 seconds rest,

30 seconds of spotty dogs,

20 seconds rest,

30 seconds of lie down stand up,

20 seconds rest,

30 seconds of sit-ups,

30 seconds rest.

 

40 seconds star jumps,

20 seconds rest,

40 seconds spotty dogs,

20 seconds rest,

40 seconds of lie down stand up,

20 seconds rest,

40 seconds of sit-ups,

30 seconds rest.

 

50 seconds of star jumps,

30 seconds rest,

50 seconds of spotty dogs,

30 seconds rest,

50 seconds of lie down stand up,

30 seconds rest,

50 seconds of sit-ups,

60 seconds rest.

 

60 seconds of star jumps,

30 seconds rest,

60 seconds of spotty dogs,

30 seconds rest,

60 seconds lie down stand ups,

30 seconds rest,

60 seconds of sit-ups

2. Pilates Workout

3. Abs Workout

Week Commencing 08.06.2020

English

1. Wishgranter Diary Entry

Watch the Wishgranter video below. You might want to watch the video a couple of times to ensure you understand the plot of the story.

Retell what happened in the story to someone in your family.

 

Today you are going to be writing a diary entry about the Wishgranter’s day at work. Before writing your diary entry, answer the questions below.

  • Does the Wishgranter enjoy his job and why?
  • How might he describe his job?
  • How could you describe the personality of the Wishgranter?

Your diary entry will be about the Wishgranter’s day at work that was shown in the video. Remember to include the following diary entry features and year 6 writing features.

2. Flashback Story Plan

Rewatch the Wishgranter video to remind yourself what happened in the story.

You are going to be turning this story into a flashback story based on the character of the Wishgranter. Before you plan your flashback story, answer the questions below.

  • How would you describe the personality of the Wishgranter?
  • Which two events in his life could have caused his personality to change and made him become miserable?
  • What might trigger the flashbacks to the two events that changed his personality?

 

You are going to use the template below to plan your flashback story for the Wishgranter. The present-day boxes will be based on his day at work which is shown in the video. The past boxes will be the flashbacks to the two events which caused the change in his personality. Next to the arrows pointing to the past boxes, write the trigger which causes the flashback to happen.

3. Wishgranter Flashback Story

You are going to write your flashback story, using your plan from yesterday. Use two coloured pencils when writing your story- one for the present day and one for the flashbacks (past). Make sure you include the features below in your story.

4. Past and Present Characters

In the Wishgranter story, what happened to the shopkeeper in the florist shop? In tomorrow’s session, you are going to be writing a flashback story based on the shopkeeper. Answer the questions below to help plan your flashback story.

  • Which events in her life could you flashback to?
  • What could trigger the flashbacks?

 

Your task is to plan the two flashbacks for the shopkeeper. There is a template below for you to use or you can bullet point the information. Plan the trigger points as well for your flashbacks.

5. Shopkeeper Flashback Story

Using your plan from yesterday, you are going to write your flashback story based on the shopkeeper. Use two coloured pencils when writing your story- one for the present day and one for the flashbacks (past). Make sure you include the features below in your story.

Maths

1. Translating Shapes

Watch the video clip to recap on translation.

Translation is when a shape on a set of coordinates has been moved to make new coordinates. For example, this blue rectangle has been moved 6 to the right and 5 down.

 

Complete the questions in the document below. You will need to draw the grid to best of your ability.

 

GREEN = Section C

YELLOW = Section B

PINK = Section A

 

Once you have finished the main task, complete the reasoning challenges. 

Name
 Translating Shapes.pdfDownload
 Translations Reasoning.pdfDownload
Showing 1-2 of 2

2. Translating Shapes

Recap from previous lesson of translating shapes.

Play Translation Station

https://www.primarygames.co.uk/pg4/TranslationStation/tstation.html

 

Complete the translation reasoning challenges below. 

Name
 Green Translations Reasoning.pdfDownload
 Pink Translations Reasoning.pdfDownload
 Yellow Translations Reasoning.pdfDownload
Showing 1-3 of 3

3. Reflecting Shapes

Watch the video below to recap reflecting shapes. 

Complete the questions in the document below. You will need to draw the grid to best of your ability.

 

GREEN = Section C

YELLOW = Section B

PINK = Section A

Name
 Reflecting Shapes Reasoning Challenges.pdfDownload
 Reflecting Shapes.pdfDownload
Showing 1-2 of 2

4. Reflecting Shapes

Using the link below, play reflect-a-sketch to recap reflecting shapes.

https://www.primarygames.co.uk/pg4/ReflectaSketch/reflectasketch.html

 

Complete the questions in the document below. You will need to draw the grid to best of your ability. Once you have finished the main task, complete the challenges. 

Name
 Green Reflections.pdfDownload
 Pink Reflections.pdfDownload
 Reflecting Shapes Challenges.pdfDownload
 Yellow Reflections.pdfDownload
Showing 1-4 of 4

5. Translating and Reflecting Shapes Reasoning

Complete the questions in the document below. 

Name
 Green Reasoning Challenges.pdfDownload
 Pink Reasoning Challenges.pdfDownload
 Yellow Reasoning Challenges.pdfDownload
Showing 1-3 of 3

Geography

1. Locating Continents, Oceans, the Tropics, Equator and Prime Meridian

Today's work has been split into four tasks and we will be using a blank map of the world for this. Remember you don’t have to print the map out; you could try and draw the map in your book.

Task 1- Watch the video below to learn about the seven continents. Once you have finished watching the video, locate the continents on the blank map of the world below. Use different colours to shade in the different continents and label with their name.

 

Task 2- Watch the video below to learn about the five oceans. Once you have finished watching the video, locate the oceans on your map of the world. Shade in the oceans using a blue coloured pencil and then label with the names of each ocean.

Task 3- Read the information sheets about the equator, hemispheres, tropics and time zones. Once you have read the information, locate and annotate your map of the world with the equator, tropic of Cancer, tropic of Capricorn and the Prime Meridian. Use a different colour for each and create a key for your map to show the meaning of each line. 

 

Task 4- Create a mini fact file for each of the seven continents and five oceans, using the information from the videos you have watched and the information sheets below.

Name
 Equator, Hemispheres and Tropics Information.pdfDownload
 Oceans Information Sheet.pdfDownload
 Time Zones.pdfDownload
Showing 1-3 of 3

2. Lines of Longitude and Latitude

Watch the video below to learn about lines of longitude and latitude on a globe. These lines provide coordinates to help locate places around the world. Once you have watched the video, read through the information document about lines of longitude and latitude to make sure you understand the differences between the two.

Lines of latitude circle the earth from east to west; one example is the equator.
Lines of longitude run from north to south; one example is the Prime Meridian.

 

Your task is to locate places around the world on a map and write down the coordinates for those given places. When writing the coordinates, the latitude coordinate is always given first.

 

Challenge- Complete the differentiated time zone challenge where you must work out the different times around the world, using the given time zone map as a guide.

Name
 Green and Yellow Longitude and Latitude.pdfDownload
 Green Time Zones.pdfDownload
 Pink Longitude and Latitude.pdfDownload
 Pink Time Zones.pdfDownload
 Yellow Time Zones.pdfDownload
Showing 1-5 of 5

3. Lines of Longitude and Latitude

Create a definition for lines of longitude and latitude in your workbook.

Watch the video below to recap the purpose of lines of longitude and latitude.

  • To find out how far north or south a place is, lines of latitude are used. These lines run parallel to the Equator.
  • To find out how far east or west a place is, lines of longitude are used. These lines run from the top of the Earth to the bottom.

Your task is to write the coordinates for the given points and then name the continent or ocean where the point is located.

 

Challenge- Complete the Equator, Hemispheres, Tropics and Pole Quiz Cards

Name
 Geography Quiz cards.pdfDownload
 Green Longitude and Latitude.pdfDownload
 Pink Longitude and Latitude.pdfDownload
 Yellow Longitude and Latitude.pdfDownload
Showing 1-4 of 4

Science

1. How We See

Where does light come from? Light seems to be all around us but can you name some light resources?

 

How does light help us see?

Light is a type of energy known as electromagnetic radiation. It is made up of photons, little particles of energy. Light travels as a wave. But unlike waves of water, or sound waves, it does not need any medium to travel through. This means light can travel through a vacuum - a completely airless space. Light waves travel out from sources of light in straight lines. These lines are often called rays or beams of light.

 

Rays of light travel from a light source and hit objects around us.

The rays of light reflect, or bounce, off an object, and then travel into our eyes. This reflection of light allows us to see the object.

Your task is to create an educational programme/vlog for children to explain all about how light enables us to see. You may want to research the topic further and use pictures and diagrams to support your explanation. Before you record your vlog/programme make a plan of what you are going to say.

 

  1. Introduce yourselves and tell the audience what the video is going to be about.
  2. Explain how light travels.
  3. Explain how light hits an object then bounces off it into our eyes, enabling us to see.
  4. Give your audience any more information you think they need to know, then thank them for watching.

 

You might want to use some of these words to help you.

  • light 
  • source
  • straight
  • energy
  • beam
  • bounce
  • reflect

2. Reflecting Light

Which one of these reflection explanations is correct? Choose one.

 

  1. Reflection is the process of light bouncing off an object or surface. Only shiny objects like metal reflects light. If the shiny object is in the Sun, it will reflect light well. Rough and dull surfaces do not reflect light.
  2. Reflection is when light bounces off an object or surface. All objects reflect light when they are held at the correct angle. Light can bounce off any object or surface, but they need to be a special angle.
  3. Reflection is the name of light bouncing off objects or surfaces. Smooth and shiny surfaces reflect light clearly, but all objects reflect light. Dull and rough surfaces scatter the reflected rays so they do not create a clear image.
  4. Reflection is when light is blocked by an object and a shadow is formed. The light cannot get through some objects, so reflection causes a darker area behind the object. Not all objects reflect light to make a shadow, just opaque ones.

How is light reflected?

Reflection is when light bounces off a surface, changing the direction of a ray of light. All objects reflect light; smooth and shiny surface reflect all the rays of light at the same angle, rather than scattering the rays of light like rough
or dull surfaces.

The light ray that hits the mirror or other object is described as the incident
ray, and the ray of light that bounces off is known as the reflected ray.

You are going to use your understanding of reflection and the angles of incidence and reflection to make a periscope.

A periscope is a device for seeing over or around something. Periscopes were first used by sailors in around 1860, who used them in submarines to see above the surface of the water. They were also used by soldiers in the First World War to see over the top of their trenches. They are still used today by tanks and some submarines.

 

A simple periscope is a tube with a mirror at either end. The mirrors need to be positioned so that the light is reflected from the mirror at one end, down the tube to the other mirror, then out of the tube to the observer’s eyes.

 

Use a cereal box, scissors, 2 mirrors and sticky tape to make your periscope. You might use the template or you may try to construct your own! Use the instructions on the Making a Periscope Activity Sheet to help you.

PE

1. Circuit Training

Star jumps- 30 seconds

10 seconds rest

Sit down stand up- 30 seconds

10 seconds rest

Mountain climbers- 30 seconds

10 seconds rest

Burpees- 30 seconds

10 seconds rest

Sprint on the spot- 1 minute

1 minute rest

 

Star jumps- 20 seconds

10 seconds rest

Sit down stand up- 20 seconds

10 seconds rest

Mountain climbers- 20 seconds

10 seconds rest

Burpees- 20 seconds

10 seconds rest

Sprint on the spot- 1 minute

1 minute rest

 

Star jumps- 10 seconds

Sit down stand up- 10 seconds

Mountain climbers- 10 seconds

Burpees- 10 seconds

Sprint on the spot- 1 minute

 

2. Pilates Workout

3. Abs Workout

4. Yoga with Alissa Kepas

Week Commencing 01.06.2020

English

 

1. Persuasive Writing- Language Features

Watch the video below to learn about persuasive writing and its purpose. 

 

The purpose of persuasive texts is to try to get people to do what you want them to do. Typical persuasive texts include advertisement, leaflets, travel brochures and letters.

 

Persuasive Language Features

  • Rule of 3: repeat something three times to make the reader pay attention- It’s an exciting, thrilling and a roller coaster of a trip!
  • Emotive language: powerful words that stir emotion in the reader- helpless, heartless, barbaric etc…
  • Rhetorical questions: questions that do not need an answer but make the reader think. Could you let these poor dogs starve to death?
  • Statistics: providing evidence to prove to the reader that what you are saying is true! 99% of customers agree that…
  • Personal pronouns: using ‘you’ and ‘we’ to get the reader involved.
  • Imagery: creating a picture in the reader’s head.

 

Your first task is to choose your favourite place (tourist attraction) to visit. This could be a theme park, a particular beach, a holiday location etc. Consider why that location is your favourite place and begin to think about how you would describe that location using emotive language.

 

You are going to write two paragraphs to persuade your friend to visit your chosen location. Your paragraphs must include the features above as well as year 6 punctuation, such as semi-colons, colons, dashes, brackets and commas.

2. Plan Travel Brochure

This week, you are going to be writing a holiday brochure about Chile so today’s task is to plan your writing. It will be easier to write your brochure if you spend time planning it out. There is a template below for you to copy when creating your plan.

 

Using the headings on the template, research Chile and why it is an exciting holiday destination. Remember that the purpose of your brochure is to persuade the reader to visit Chile. Below are some images of Chile which you can use to help describe the destination in your plan.

Name
 Brochure Plan.pdfDownload
 Images of Chile.pdfDownload
Showing 1-2 of 2

3. Chile Holiday Brochure

Over two sessions, you are going to write your holiday brochure for Chile. Before writing your holiday brochure, read the examples below to remind yourself of the features and writing style for travel brochures. Make sure your writing includes the following features.

  • Rule of 3- repeat something three times to make the reader pay attention
  • Emotive language (powerful feelings and emotions)
  • Rhetorical questions
  • Statistics- provide evidence to prove to the reader that what you are saying is true.
  • Imagery- create a picture in the reader’s mind.
  • Varied punctuation (semi-colons, colons, dashes, commas, brackets)
Name
 Example- Cruise Holiday Brochure.pdfDownload
 Example- Florida Holiday Brochure.pdfDownload
 Example- Paris Holiday Brochure.pdfDownload
Showing 1-3 of 3

4. Holiday to Chile TV Advert

Using your writing from the previous two sessions, you are going to create a TV advert to persuade someone in your family to go on holiday to Chile. After you have created your advert, present it to a member of your family. Your writing from the previous sessions can be used in your advert as it includes key information about Chile.

 

Watch the video below as it will show you four different types of persuasive adverts. 

Maths

 

1. Properties of 2D Shapes

Watch the video below to recap the properties of 2D shapes. 

Name
 Green Questions.pdfDownload
 Pink Questions.pdfDownload
 Yellow Questions.pdfDownload
Showing 1-3 of 3

2. Circles

Use your knowledge from a previous lesson to identify and name the different parts of a circle.

 

The radius of a circle is half of the diameter.

Complete the following diameter and radius worksheet using this rule to help you. Once you have finished this, complete the reasoning challenges. 

Name
 Circle Reasoning Challenges.pdfDownload
 Diameter and Radius Questions.pdfDownload
Showing 1-2 of 2

3. 3D Shapes

Use the video to write a definition for the following properties of a shape:

Faces =

Edges =

Vertices =

Complete the table below. Include a sketch of each shape in the relevant box. You may need to research some of the shapes to know what they look like. Once you have completed the properties table, complete the reasoning challenges. 

Name
 3D Shapes Properties.pdfDownload
 Reasoning- 3D Shapes.pdfDownload
Showing 1-2 of 2

4. Shape Reasoning Challenges

Recap from previous lessons by looking over 2D shapes, 3D shapes and the parts of a circle.

Write down three 2D shapes.

Write down three 3D shapes.

Write down as many parts of a circle as possible.

Name
 Green Reasoning Challenges.pdfDownload
 Pink Reasoning Challenges.pdfDownload
 Yellow Reasoning Challenges.pdfDownload
Showing 1-3 of 3

5. 3D Nets

Watch the video below to recap 3D shape nets.

 

The net of a 3D shape is what it looks like if it is opened out flat. A net can be folded up to make a 3D shape.

There may be several possible nets for one 3D shape. You can draw a net on paper, then fold it into the shape.

 

Complete the reasoning challenges below. 

Name
 Reasoning Challenge 1.pdfDownload
 Reasoning Challenge 2.pdfDownload
 Reasoning Challenge 3.pdfDownload
Showing 1-3 of 3

Geography Week

 

1. Locating South America

South America is the fourth largest continent in size and the fifth largest in population. It is located primarily in the southern hemisphere. It is bordered by the Atlantic Ocean to the east and the Pacific Ocean to the west. The geography of South America is dominated by the Andes Mountain Range and the Amazon River (second longest river in the world). 

 

Watch the video clip below to recap the countries that form the continent of South America.

Using the information in the video and your own research, you are going to create a mini fact file about the location of South America and the countries that form this continent. There is a template below for your fact file or you can create your own layout. Your fact file should include the following information.

  • The location of South America in the world.
  • Which hemisphere is it part of?
  • How its location relates to the equator and the importance of this.
  • The different regions of South America and the countries that are included in these regions (north, east, south and west).
  • Use of geographical language

      -Continent

      -Hemisphere

      -Equator

      -North/North-east/East/South-east/South/South-west/West/North-west

2. Physical Geography of South America

In this session, you are going to be learning about the physical geography of South America and plotting this on a map.

 

Physical geography is the study of how physical characteristics define a region or place. Physical features are the natural land formations that made up the surface area.

  • Oceans
  • Mountains
  • Lakes
  • Rivers
  • Volcanoes

 

Look at the website below to learn about the physical geography of South America and carry out your own research as well. The information from the website is also in the document list further down.

https://www.nationalgeographic.org/encyclopedia/south-america-physical-geography/

 

Your task is to draw the physical features of South America on the blank map. There is an example below to show you how it should look; it is not complete as we didn't want to do all the work for you!

 

You can create your own symbols to use for the different physical features; make sure you include a key to show the meaning of each symbol. Try to include as many physical features as you can. A template of the map is provided for you below or you can use it as a guide to draw the map out on A4 paper.

Name
 Map of South America.pdfDownload
 South America Information Sheet.pdfDownload
Showing 1-2 of 2

3. Trade Links in South America

South America’s major exports, in terms of value, are mostly primary commodities, including food and plant products, fuels, and raw materials. Within the first group, the most important products are sugar, bananas, cocoa, coffee, beef, corn, and wheat. Oil, natural gas, and petroleum products dominate the second group, while linseed oil, cotton, cattle hides, fish meal, wool, copper, tin, iron ore, lead, and zinc top the third group.

 

Using the information sheet below and your own research, draw examples of products that each country in the continent produces and exports to other countries around the world on the blank map of South America. For example, Peru exports coffee, sugar, peppers and more around the world. Therefore on the map, you would draw those items on the country of Peru.

 

There is an example below of how the map might look; it is not complete as we didn't want to do all the work for you!

A template of the map is provided for you below or you can use it as a guide to draw the map out on A4 paper.

Name
 Map of South America.pdfDownload
 South America Trade Links.pdfDownload
Showing 1-2 of 2

4. Comparing the UK and Chile- Physical Geography

Watch the video below to learn about the physical geography of Chile.

Your task is to find similarities and differences between the physical geography of the UK and Chile. Remember that physical geography incorporates the following elements.

  • Land formation
  • Rivers and lakes
  • Mountains and volcanoes
  • Plants and animals (flora and fauna)
  • Weather and climate

 

You can use the video above and your own research to complete this work. To present your findings, draw a table to list the similarities and differences between the UK and Chile. There is a template below which you can use. You can write the information in bullet points but make sure there is enough detail for each point.

5. Comparing the UK and Chile- Human Geography

Your task is to find similarities and differences between the human geography of the UK and Chile. Remember that human geography incorporates the following elements.

  • Population
  • Language spoken
  • Types of houses
  • Land use
  • Economic activity (How does the region make money? What does it trade?)
  • Key landmarks and buildings

 

You will need to use the internet to research the human geography of both countries. To present your findings, draw a table to list the similarities and differences between the UK and Chile. There is a template below which you can use. You can write the information in bullet points but make sure there is enough detail for each point.

PE

 

1. Abs Workout

2. Yoga with Alissa Kepas

3. Circuit Training

1-minute jogging on the spot

30 seconds squat jumps

20 seconds rest

 

1-minute high knees

30 seconds star jumps

20 seconds rest

 

1 minute holding the plank

30 seconds sit ups

20 seconds rest

 

1 minute of burpees

30 seconds mountain climbers

20 seconds rest

 

Repeat the circuit three times.

Week Commencing 18.05.2020

English

1. Converting Biographies into Autobiographies

A biography is a text written about someone else's life (usually someone famous). An autobiography is a text written about one's own life.

 

Remember that an autobiography is written in the first person and past tense.

 

You are going to convert the given biography extracts into autobiographies. Below is an extract from a biography followed by the example of turning it into an autobiography.

 

Roald Dahl wrote his stories in an armchair in his garden shed. He always wrote on yellow paper with a sharp pencil. Roald Dahl is famous for saying that all a writer needs is 'what is in his head, a pencil and some paper.' 

 

I wrote my stories in an armchair in my garden shed. I always wrote on yellow paper with a sharp pencil. I am famous for saying that all a writer needs is ‘what is in his head, a pencil and some paper.’

2. Plan an Autobiography

You are going to be planning your own autobiography today about one important event in your life. Use the template below to create your autobiography plan. Remember that an autobiography is written in the first person.

3. Writing your Autobiography

Over two sessions, you are going to write your autobiography about your chosen event. Before writing your autobiography, read the example below to remind yourself of the features and writing style for autobiographies. Make sure your writing includes the following features.

  • An opening paragraph to introduce yourself
  • A closing paragraph explaining the importance of the event
  • Written in chronological order
  • Contains dates linked to specific events
  • Written in the past tense
  • Written in the first person
  • Emotive language (feelings and emotions)
  • Time conjunctions to link ideas
  • Varied punctuation (semi-colons, colons, dashes, commas, brackets)

4. SPaG- Prepositions

Prepositions are linking words in a sentence. We use prepositions to explain where things are in time or space. Prepositions tell us where something is (for example, beside, under, on, against, beneath or over) or when something is happening (for example: until, during, after, before or more specifically 'on Christmas Day', 'at twelve o'clock' or 'in August').

 

Using the image below, write 20 examples of sentences that include prepositions or prepositional phrases. 

5 sentences must include a semi-colon. 

5 sentences must include a colon. 

 

The frog is under the table. 

Under is the preposition as it tells you where the frog is in relation to the table. 

Inside the cage, there was an elf: the witch was going to cast a spell on him. 

 

This sentence includes a prepositional phrase at the beginning of the sentence. Inside is the preposition as it tells you where the elf is. 

Maths

 

1. Angles on a Straight Line

Recap what each angle is and how many degrees are in each one by watching the clip. Play the angles quiz on the BBC Bitesize website.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/zb6tyrd/articles/zg68k7h

 

Angles on a straight line add up to 180°. Work out the missing angles by using the subtraction method.

Name
 Angles on a Straight Line.pdfDownload
Showing 1-1 of 1

2. Angles in a Circle

Recap from previous session of angles on a straight line. Watch clip of angles in a circle.

 

Angles in a circle add up to 360°. Work out the missing angles by using the subtraction method.

Name
 Angles in a Circle.pdfDownload
Showing 1-1 of 1

3. Vertically Opposite Angles

Watch the video to gain an understanding about what vertically opposite angles are.

 

The angles opposite each other when two lines cross. They are always equal.
In this example a° and b° are vertically opposite angles.

Name
 Green Vertically Opposite Angles.pdfDownload
 Pink Vertically Opposite Angles.pdfDownload
 Yellow Vertically Opposite Angles.pdfDownload
Showing 1-3 of 3

4. Angles in a Triangle

Angles of a triangle add up to 180°. Different types of triangles determine the size of the angle.

 

Complete the following missing angle calculations by using the subtraction method.

Name
 Angles in Triangles.pdfDownload
 Reasoning Challenges.pdfDownload
Showing 1-2 of 2

5. Angles in Quadrilaterals

Angles in a quadrilateral add up to 360°.

Watch the video and then complete the following missing angle questions using the subtraction method.

Name
 Angles in Quadrilaterals.pdfDownload
 Reasoning- Angles in Quadrilaterals.pdfDownload
Showing 1-2 of 2

Joy of Moving Home School Festival

Art

1. Analysing Artwork

Look at the painting ‘Street Scene’ by Lowry. Describe the painting to someone you live with. You have been given two afternoon sessions to recreate this painting using household items, materials and items found outside. If you take your time, your artwork will look very similar to this. Consider the shapes and colours used when recreating this piece.

2. Artwork in the Style of Lowry

You have been given two afternoon sessions to create a piece of artwork in the style of Lowry. Your artwork can be based on the view from where you live or your favourite view. Consider the colours and shapes used in Lowry’s artwork as you are replicating that style.

PE

1. Abs Workout

2. Yoga with Alissa Kepas

3. Circuit Training

 

1-minute jogging on the spot

30 seconds squat jumps

20 seconds rest

 

1-minute high knees

30 seconds star jumps

20 seconds rest

 

1 minute holding the plank

30 seconds sit ups

20 seconds rest

 

1 minute of burpees

30 seconds mountain climbers

20 seconds rest

 

Repeat the circuit three times.

Week Commencing 11.05.2020

English

 

This week, you are going to be writing a biography about J.K. Rowling. Remember that a biography is an account of someone’s life which has been written by someone else.

 

1. Timeline of Events

Watch the video below to find out who J.K. Rowling is and why she is famous.

Using the video and your own research, you are going to create a timeline for J.K. Rowling’s life. The timeline must start with her birth and then finish at the present day. Your timeline must include the events below and others that you will find out through your research for example, her marriage. For each event on your timeline, it must include the date, name of the event and a drawing of the event. Remember that your timeline must be in chronological order.

 

  • Birth
  • Birth of her sister
  • Starting at school
  • Going to university
  • Thinks of the idea for her first novel and begins to writes it
  • Mother dies
  • Birth of her daughter
  • Finishes writing her first novel
  • Being rejected by publishing houses
  • Bloomsbury accepting to publish her first novel
  • When each book in the series is published in the UK
  • Birth of her son and daughter
  • When each film adaptation is published in the UK
  • Official opening of Harry Potter and the Cursed Child Play
  • Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them films are released

2. Researching J.K. Rowling

Watch the video below to learn more about J.K. Rowling. 

 

Using your timeline from yesterday, choose four main events from J.K. Rowling’s life that you will research in more detail. The fifth aspect to research will be her impact on children’s literature. When choosing the events to research in more detail, consider which ones would be important to include in a biography about her. Write each event as a subheading and bullet point your research underneath. 

3. Plan for Biography

You are going to be creating a plan for your biography about J.K. Rowling. Using the subheadings below, bullet point the information that will be included in each section.

  • Introduction
  • Early Life
  • Marriage and Family Life
  • Harry Potter Series
  • Impact on Children’s Literature
  • Concluding Paragraph

 

Remember that a biography is written using factual information. Make sure your plan includes enough detail as this will make it easier for you to write your biography later in the week.

4. Writing a Biography

Over two sessions, you are going to write your biography about J.K. Rowling. Before writing your biography, read the example below to remind yourself of the features and writing style for biographies. Make sure your writing includes the following features.

  • An opening paragraph that introduces the subject and explains why she is known
  • A closing statement summarising the importance of J.K. Rowling
  • Written in chronological order
  • Includes subheadings for sections (look at your plan)
  • Contains dates linked to specific events
  • Written in the past tense
  • Written in the third person
  • Time conjunctions to link ideas
  • Events not just listed but engage the reader
  • Varied punctuation (semi-colons, colons, dashes, commas, brackets)
Name
 Example- Roald Dahl Biography.pdfDownload
Showing 1-1 of 1

Maths

1. Fractions of Amounts

Watch the video to recap how to find a fraction of a number. 

 

When finding a fraction of a number, we divide by the denominator and multiply by the numerator.

Complete the calculations below.

2. Percentages of Amounts

Watch the video to recap how to find a percentage of a number.

Complete the calculations below.

3. Statistics

Watch the videos below to recap the different ways to present data, when we might use them and how we calculate the mean (average).

Complete the following statistics questions in the documents below.

Name
 Green Statistics Reasoning.pdfDownload
 Pink Statistics Reasoning.pdfDownload
 Yellow Statistics Reasoning.pdfDownload
Showing 1-3 of 3

4. Statistics

How many different ways can we present data? Think about the different graphs, charts and tables you can draw to present data.

Complete the following statistics questions in the documents below.

Name
 Green Statistics Reasoning.pdfDownload
 Pink Statistics Reasoning.pdfDownload
 Yellow Statistics Reasoning.pdfDownload
Showing 1-3 of 3

5. Statistics

Complete the following statistics reasoning questions in the documents below.

Name
 Green Statistics Reasoning.pdfDownload
 Pink Statistics Reasoning.pdfDownload
 Yellow Statistics Reasoning.pdfDownload
Showing 1-3 of 3

Topic

1. The Treaty of Alfred and Guthrum
After Alfred the Great’s victory in the Battle of Edington, he agreed with King Guthrum (the Viking leader) to allow the Vikings to live in Eastern England. This included York, modern day Yorkshire, Nottingham, Derby, Lincoln, Essex, Cambridge, Suffolk, Norfolk and others. The new Viking kingdom was known as Danelaw. The Treaty of Alfred and Guthrum was created, defining the boundaries of their kingdoms, with provisions for peaceful relations between Saxon England and Danelaw (Viking England). As part of this treaty, Guthrum converted to Christianity and took the name Aethelstan with Alfred the Great becoming his godfather.

 

 

Write two paragraphs explaining the importance of the Treaty of Alfred and Guthrum. You can use the information above as well as carrying out further research on the internet to find facts that you can include in your paragraphs. Make sure your paragraphs include the following information.

 

  • What was the Treaty of Alfred and Guthrum?
  • Which areas of England became the new Viking territory called Danelaw?
  • What is the significance of this event and how did it affect the future of England?

2. Viking Place Names

We can tell where the Vikings settled by place names of towns and villages today. Some of the names of places in Britain are made up of Viking words.

 

  • Place names ending in –by.
    –by meant farm or homestead (village). These places mark the earliest Viking settlements.

E.g. Derby - A village where deer are found.

 

  • Place names ending in –thorpe (or -thorp, -throp or –trop).

-thorpe meant farms.

 

  • Place names ending in –toft or-tofts.

A -toft referred to the site of a house or a plot of land.

 

Research Viking words, their meanings and examples of place names for each Viking word. Your research can include searching google maps. Use the template below to record your research. This table includes a selection of Viking words, therefore if you find more when researching, add more rows to your table with examples of them used in place names.

RE

1. Who do we rely on?

In RE, Mrs Harrison would like you to learn about consequences and that actions have consequences which affect others. Due to this, we need to think carefully about our behaviour. Christians would also consider what God would think about their behaviour and whether they were right or wrong. We all have people we depend on and we have people who depend on us. Draw an outline of a person and inside write down the people who rely on you. This can include pets. On the outside of the outline, write down the people that you rely on. Think carefully about who we need at the moment: shopkeepers, farmers, nurses as well as those in our family. You can use bubble writing and other fonts for your work as well as colours.

Science

1. Why does light travel in straight lines?

Watch the clip on BBC Bitesize to discover why light travels in a straight line.
https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/clips/zyntsbk

 

Do you know how light travels?

Select the missing words from the torch below and fill in the gaps.

 

Light travels in ________ lines from a ______________ of light, which bounces off an object. We can see the object because the ______________ enters our eyes. Wood and cardboard are ___________ objects, which light cannot travel through. _______________ is a _____________ material which allows light to pass through. Tissue paper is ____________ which will let some light travel through. When an object blocks out the ___________, a ___________ is formed. Shadows are __________ at midday and _________ at the end of the day.

2. Back to Front!

Watch the video below and think about the following questions:

  • What do you think is going on?
  • Can you predict how the light will behave?
  • Why do the letters appear reversed?
  • How might different jars and letters react in different ways?

 

When the jar is empty light passes through. After it has been filled with water, the light bends or refracts. The water makes the light change direction, the light from the left side of the paper moves to the right and vice versa. Because the light swaps around, we see the word reversed.

 

Mirror Writing

Write a message on a piece of paper. Hold a mirror upright at the top of your paper and watch your writing in the mirror. Try to write so that you can read it correctly in the mirror. 

PE

1. HIIT 20 Minute Workout

2. Sun Salutations and Relaxation Activities

3. Yoga Class

Complete the 15-minute yoga class below. 

Week Commencing 04.05.2020

English

1. Using Colons

 

Watch the videos to recap what a colon is and why we use them in our writing. 

Activity One

Read the sentences below and work out the rule for using a colon. Write an explanation for each one.

  1. There was one obvious reason for the fire: the faulty wiring.
  2. The following cars are the most popular: Hondas, Toyotas, and Fords.
  3. Marcia and Hugh have two lovely daughters: Page and Eliza.
  4. He had two things he wanted to say: he loved her, and he wanted to marry
  5. She wanted one thing from this vacation: to get lots of rest.
  6. There are several activities to do on the beach: swim, 
snorkel, build sandcastles, or read a book.
  7. To get ready for the camping trip, she needed to buy the following items:  coffee, beans, candles, matches, bottled water, and granola.
  8. Barry wanted only one thing from life: lots of money.

 

Activity Two

Rewrite the following sentences and insert a colon or semi colon into it. Remember to work out the rule before deciding what punctuation to include.

 

  1. The coach told the players to do one thing to have fun while playing.
  2. The game is always exciting the crowd gets really involved.
  3. The kids came up with cool superhero names and matching titles Marvoman, Defender of the UniverseBrillia Woman, Protector of the World Aqua Goddess, Matron of the Sea and Terra Man, Keeper of the Earth.
  4. I like to swim in the ocean every morning the cold water wakes me up.
  5. I know the key ingredient to delicious curries high-quality meat and fresh cumin.
  6. If the odds were 25:1 there was just one thing left for Dale to do place a bet.

2. Active and Passive Voice

 

Watch the video on the website below to recap what the active and passive voice is. 

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/z4hrt39/articles/zkttng8 

 

Activity One- Play the passive voice quiz on the BBC bitesize page.

Activity Two

Rewrite the following active sentences so they become passive.

  1. Loggers cut down a giant oak tree.
  2. The immune system defends the body from infection.
  3. The examiners will carefully mark your papers.
  4. A dog bit two children in the park.
  5. Roald Dahl wrote the BFG.
  6. Insects pollinate flowers.
  7. The earthquake destroyed many buildings.

 

Rewrite these passive sentences so they become active.

  1. Phillip was persuaded to come along by Gloria.
  2. The winning goal was scored by Alan Shearer.
  3. Drivers who break the speed limit will be caught by the automatic cameras.
  4. The field was ploughed by the farmer with his blue tractor.

3. Explanation Text Plan

 

An explanation text is a non-fiction piece of writing which is meant to describe a process such as how a car is made for example. Explanation texts include specific features that include subheadings, present tense, time conjunctions, technical vocabulary, causal conjunctions and diagrams with labels.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/teach/class-clips-video/english-ks1-ks2-how-to-write-an-explanation/zh2kjhv

Watch the video and write notes about how a volcano erupts.  Once you have watched the video, plan an explanation text to explain how volcanoes erupt. Use the guide to help you.

Name
 Plan Example.pdfDownload
Showing 1-1 of 1

4. Explanation Text

 

Read through your plan from yesterday to recap how volcanos erupt. Read through the example of an explanation text in the document below and pick out the following features:

  • Introduction
  • Technical vocabulary
  • Time conjunctions
  • Present tense
  • Conclusion

 

Use the example to write your own explanation text based on how volcanoes erupt. Tick off the features in the checklist when you have included them in your work.

  • A clear title to show what is being explained

  • An opening statement to introduce the process

  • Clear steps to show how or why something occurs

  • The events in order

  • Time conjunctions (before, after, next)

  • Causal conjunctions (as a result, consequently, subsequently)

Name
 Examples of Causal Conjunctions.pdfDownload
 Explanation Text Example.pdfDownload
Showing 1-2 of 2

Maths

1. Comparing Fractions 

 

Watch the video below to remind yourself of the method we use when comparing fractions.

When comparing fractions, you need to follow these instructions.

  1. Find a common denominator (think of your times tables)
  2. Convert the numerator
  3. Look at the new fractions and compare the size of them
  4. Use the greater than or less than sign to compare the original fractions

2. Ordering Fractions

 

Watch the video below to remind yourself of the method we use when ordering fractions.

When ordering fractions, you need to follow these instructions.

  1. Find a common denominator (think of your times tables)
  2. Convert the numerator
  3. Look at the new fractions and order them from smallest to largest
  4. Write the original fractions in order from smallest to largest
  5. Sometimes the question might ask for them to be written from largest to smallest so read it carefully

3. Fractions, Decimals and Percentages

 

Watch the video below to remind yourself of the method we use when converting between fractions, decimals and percentages. Once you have watched the video, fill in the missing values in the tables below.

4. Fractions, Decimals and Percentages

 

Rewatch the video from yesterday’s lesson to recap how to convert between fractions, decimals and percentages.

 

Someone has mixed up the values in the tables below. In your book, draw the table and match up the fractions with the correct decimals and percentages.

Topic

This week, you will be learning about World War Two with a focus on the Blitz because the country will be celebrating VE Day on Friday. On 8th May 1945, the German army surrendered to the Allies which signalled the end of World War Two. This was known as VE day. 

 

1. How did World War Two Begin?

On 3rd September 1939, Neville Chamberlain- the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom- declared war on Germany due to the fact that Hitler had refused to abandon his invasion of Poland. Watch the video below to learn more about the start of World War Two.

Using the information in the video and your own research, answer the questions below about how World War Two began.

 

1. Which country started World War 2?

2. What year did World War 2 begin?

3. How many countries were involved in World War 2?

4. Name 2 things World War 2 was the first war to ever involve?

    a)

    b)

5. How many people in total lost their lives in World War 2?

6. Who was the leader of Germany?

7. Who was the leader of Britain?

8. Name 2 countries that Germany invaded in 1939:

     a)

    b)

9. Why did Germany invade these countries?

10. Why did Hitler order thousands of German bomber planes to drop bombs on British cities?

11. What was this called?                  

2. The Blitz- Blackouts

During the war, everyone had to cover their windows and doors at night (before sunset) with heavy blackout curtains, cardboard or paint. They needed to prevent any glimmer of light from escaping and aiding enemy aircraft during the bombing raids. Street lights were switched off or dimmed and shielded to deflect the light downward. Traffic lights and vehicle headlights were fitted with slotted covers to deflect the beam down to the floor. The number of road accidents increased because of the lack of street lighting and the dimmed traffic lights. To help prevent accidents, white stripes were painted on the roads and on lamp-posts. Other people were injured during the blackout because they could not see in the darkness. Many people were injured tripping up, falling down steps, or bumping into things.

Your task is to look around your home for materials that could have been used during the blackout to hide the light from showing outside. The materials only need be a size that will cover the top of a cardboard box. Once you have found a range of materials, you are going to test each one to see how effective they are when used to conceal light. You will need a cardboard box, a torch (this could be a phone torch) and a range of materials to test. 

 

Method

  1. Place the torch inside the cardboard box.
  2. Turn the torch on.
  3. Lay your first piece of material over the top of the box and make notes on whether any light escapes through the material.
  4. Repeat this with each of the materials you have found.
  5. In your book, draw a table for your results which allows you to list the materials and how effective they were when used to shield the light.

 

Write a paragraph explaining which was the most effective blackout material and why. Remember that the aim of the blackout was to hide all light from the skies so that the enemy could not find the cities.

3. The Blitz- Air Raids

Listed below are the different measures put in place to protect people during the air raids. Under each subheading, explain how it was used to protect people during the Blitz. Use the information from the video and from the document below to complete your task.   

  • Gas Masks
  • Anderson Shelters
  • Morrison Shelters
  • The Underground
  • Blackout
  • Evacuees
Name
 The Blitz Shelters.pdfDownload
Showing 1-1 of 1

In a paragraph, compare the measures taken to protect people during the air raids and decide which would be the most efficient method to use. Justify your answer with evidence from your own research and the information provided.

4. VE Day Postcards

On 8th May 1945, the Allies accepted Germany’s surrender which signalled the end of World War Two. This day became known as VE Day (Victory in Europe) as this is when Winston Churchill announced the end of World War Two in Europe. Street parties were held all over Britain to celebrate the end of the war.

Your task is to write a postcard to a family member or friend about VE Day. Imagine you were in London when the news that the war had ended was announced.

  • What did you hear?
  • What did you do once it had been announced?
  • What did you eat?
  • How long did you celebrate for?

Use a piece of A4 paper to create your postcard. On one side, write your message to either a family member or friend and remember to include an address on the right-hand side. On the reverse side, draw a picture showing what happened on VE Day. There is a template for the message side of the postcard below and on the back is where you will draw your picture. 

PE

 

1. This week, Miss Garthwaite has created a short workout which lasts around four minutes with four different exercises. For each exercise, you have one minute to see how many of them you can do before moving on to the next exercise. This workout consists of star jumps, burpees, squat jumps and press ups. As you all know, Miss Garthwaite has a very competitive side and has therefore completed this herself and set you the challenge of beating her score shown below. 

 

On Facebook, there is a video from Miss Garthwaite about this challenge. Please comment on the post with your results as Miss Garthwaite has said that she will redo the challenge if anyone manages to beat her scores. Good luck! 

2. HIIT 20 Minute Workout

Week Commencing 27.04.2020

English

1. Using Parenthesis

 

Watch the video to recap what parenthesis is and why we use it.

Activity 1
Answer the following questions:

 

  • Why do you think that when using punctuation for parenthesis that they often come in pairs? E.g. two commas, two brackets or two dashes.
  • John who was normally up late was up and out by 7am. What is the extra information that should be punctuated correctly? How do you know?

  • Sarah is a vegetarian – she doesn’t eat meat –
    What is wrong with the sentence above?

  • If you were to add extra information at the end of the sentence which set of punctuation would be most appropriate? Explain why.

  • Why are relative clauses an example of using parenthesis?

 

Activity Two

Create ten sentences that embed extra information into a sentence. Make sure you punctuate your sentences correctly.

2. Using Semi-Colons

 

Click on the link below to recap what semi colons are and when we use them.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/zvwwxnb/articles/zshfdxs

Complete the semi colon quiz on the BBC Bitesize page.

 

Activity One

Rewrite the sentences below, inserting a semi-colon in the correct place.

  • Call me tomorrow I will give you my answer then.
  • English was Chloe’s favourite subject she particularly enjoyed writing stories.
  • Susan loves to swim her brother likes to dive.
  • My hair is very wet I have just washed it.
  • Climbing a mountain shouldn’t be done when it is raining the rocks become slippery.
  • I always recommend Nando’s they have a great menu.

 

Activity Two

Answer the following questions:

  • What are two different reasons for using a semi colon in your writing?
  • What three main things can semi colons replace?
  • How might people use semi colons incorrectly?
  • What is wrong with the following sentence?
    My hair is very wet; ice-cream is very cold.

3. Creating Character Profiles

 

This week, you will be writing your own adventure story. Create two profiles using two of the characters below as they will be the main characters in your story. Use the template below to help you.

4. Planning your Story

 

Using the characters from the previous task, plan an adventure story based on them. Think about the following questions:

  • Where is the story going to be set?
  • What year will the story take place?
  • Which characters will appear in the story?
  • What problem occurs in the story and does it get resolved?

Use one of the templates below to plan your story. 

5. Writing your Story

 

Write your story using the plan that you created to help. Remember to refer back to the success criteria provided to ensure you are including the correct features.

Maths

1. Fractions of Amounts

When finding fractions of amounts, we divide the number by the denominator and then multiply our answer by the numerator. Look at the examples below to remind you about the method we use. Complete all the fractions of amounts investigations and reasoning challenges.  

2. Simplifying Fractions

 

Watch the video below as it will remind you how to simplify fractions. Remember that when simplifying fractions, you have to think about which times tables the numerator and denominator both appear in and use those times tables facts.

3. Adding and Subtracting Fractions

 

Watch the video as it will remind you of the method we use when adding and subtracting fractions with different denominators.

When adding and subtracting fractions with different denominators, there are four steps you must complete to be able to answer the question.  

 

  1. If using mixed numbers, convert them into improper fractions
  2. Find a common denominator (think of your times tables)
  3. Convert the numerator
  4. Add or subtract the fractions
  5. Simplify your answer if appropriate (think of your times tables)

4. Adding and Subtracting Fractions

 

Complete the codebreaker challenge for adding and subtracting fractions with different denominators. Click on the links below to open the worksheet. Once you have finished, complete your reasoning challenges which are below.

Name
 Green Codebreaker.docxDownload
 Yellow and Pink Codebreaker.docxDownload
Showing 1-2 of 2

5. Multiplying and Dividing Fractions

 

When multiplying fractions, these are the steps you need to follow.

  1. Multiply the numerators together
  2. Multiply the denominators together
  3. Simplify your answer if appropriate

When multiplying mixed numbers, these are the steps you need to follow.

  1. Convert the mixed numbers into improper fractions
  2. Multiply the numerators together
  3. Multiply the denominators together
  4. Convert your answer back into a mixed number 

When dividing fractions by a whole number, these are the steps you need to follow.

  1. Multiply the denominator by the whole number
  2. Simplify your answer if appropriate

When dividing mixed numbers by a whole number, these are the steps you need to follow.

  1. Convert the mixed number into an improper fraction
  2. Multiply the denominator by the whole number
  3. Convert your answer back into a mixed number

Topic

1. Alfred the Great Family Tree

Watch the video on this website to learn about who Alfred the Great was.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/zxsbcdm/articles/z9tdq6f

 

Alfred was born in the year AD 849 in the kingdom of Wessex, which was located in the southwest of England. Alfred's father, Aethelwulf, was King of Wessex, so Alfred grew up as a prince. However, he had four older brothers (Aethlestan, Aethelbald, Aethelberht and Aethelred), so it was doubtful that he would ever become king. Alfred was an intelligent child who loved to learn and memorise poems. As a child, he travelled to Rome, where he met the Pope. When Alfred's father died in AD 858, his brother- Aethelbald- became king as Alfred’s eldest brother (Aethlestan) had died during battle years earlier. Over the next several years each of his brothers died until his last elder brother, Aethelred, was crowned king.

 

Using the information above and your own research, create a family tree for Alfred the Great. Your family tree should start with his father, Aethelwulf, and should include the following information.

  • Name
  • Year of birth-Year of death
  • Drawing of the person (images below to help you)

2. The Battle of Edington Fact File

 

During Alfred the Great’s reign as King, the Battle of Edington was one of the most important battles to take place. Using questions below, research the Battle of Edington on the internet.

 

  • Who was involved in the Battle of Edington?
  • Where did this battle take place?
  • What happened during the battle?
  • Who won the fight?
  • What happened after the battle had ended?
  • Why was this battle seen as significant during King Alfred’s reign?

 

Using your research, create a fact file about the Battle of Edington that answers the questions above. Remember to include factual information, subheadings and drawings in your fact file.

Comprehension and Handwriting Sheets

Name
 1. Living on the Ice Comprehension.pdfDownload
 2. Living on the Ice Questions.pdfDownload
 3. Comprehension Vocabulary Task.pdfDownload
 4. Handwriting- All My Great Excuses.pdfDownload
Showing 1-4 of 4

Science

1. Big Question- What if there were two suns?

Answer the following questions by carrying out research and using your knowledge from your year 5 space unit in science.

  • How is the Sun important to us on planet Earth?
  • Would we orbit both suns?
  • What would happen to the Earth if there was twice the amount of heat?
  • What would happen to the Earth if there was twice the amount of light?
  • Would two suns have an effect on our day and night?

The Earth orbits around the Sun and it provides us with a natural source of heat and light, which warms our seas and gives energy to green plants. This in turn provides the food and oxygen for life on Earth. Having two suns might mean that we have two days and nights in a 24-hour time period. The days could be much brighter and warmer and the seasons might change more rapidly.

Write a paragraph to explain what would happen if there were two suns.

2. Making Shadows Experiment

 

This week, we are starting a new science unit based on light. This activity looks at how shadows are formed and what affects their size, direction and shape.

 

Equipment you will need: Sheet of paper (white), pencils, torch (you can use the torch off your phone), toy/figure, blue tack.

 

This activity works best in a dark room.

  1. Place the figure in the centre of the paper and use blue tack to keep it upright.
  2. Move the torch slowly around the figure and use an x to plot North, South, East and West on the paper.
  3. Draw the outline of the shadows on each of these points.
  4. Answer the following questions.
  • What is different about each shadow?
  • What is the same?
  • How has the shape changed?
  • Has the size changed?

PE, Yoga and Mindfulness

1. Circuit Training

 

High knees- 20 seconds
Burpees- 20 seconds
Squat jumps- 20 seconds
30 second rest and then repeat twice

 

Mountain climbers- 20 seconds
Sit ups- 20 seconds
Hold the plank- 20 seconds
30 second rest and then repeat twice

2. Sun Salutations and Relaxation Activities

3. Fit Dice Game

 

Create your own circuit training workout with the Fit Dice game.

4. Yoga Class 

 

Complete the 15-minute yoga class below. 

Week Commencing 20.04.2020

English

 

1. Writing Orientations for a Newspaper Report

 

Watch the three video clips below.

  • Dorothy melts the Wicked Witch of the West

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aopdD9Cu-So

 

  • Running through the wall to Platform 9 ¾ at Kings Cross Station

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MTykayOv_XA

 

  • Violet Beauregarde looks like a blueberry

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Yqw_f26SvM

 

Write an orientation paragraph for each of the events in the video clips. Remember that an orientation must include the 5W’s (who, what, when, where and why). 

2. Researching Captain Tom Moore

 

Research Captain Tom Moore who has recently raised money for the NHS. You will be using this research to write a newspaper report later in the week so it is important to gather as much information as possible. It will be easier to write your newspaper report if you gather more information. Base your research on the headings below.

  • Early Life
  • Military Career
  • NHS Fundraising
  • Impact of Fundraising

3. Plan for a Newspaper Report

 

Use the headings below to plan your newspaper report about Captain Tom Moore and the fundraising he has recently carried out. Write in bullet points underneath each heading for your plan.

 

  • Headline
  • Orientation (5W’s)
  • Paragraph One- What has he done in more detail
  • Paragraph Two- Early life and military career
  • Paragraph Three- Impact and importance of his fundraising
  • Closing Paragraph- Summarise what has happened and the importance of the event

Underneath your plan

  • Write five examples of quotes which you will include in your report. Remember that quotes say exactly what the person said when they were interviewed and include speech punctuation.
  • Write five examples of indirect speech which you will include in your report. Remember that indirect speech is where you summarise what a person has said. No speech punctuation is needed for this.

4. Captain Tom Moore Newspaper Report

 

Over two sessions, write your newspaper report about Captain Tom Moore and the fundraising he has carried out. Remember that you do not need to include these headings; they are just to show you what you are writing about during each session.

First session

  • Headline
  • Orientation
  • Paragraph One- What has he done in more detail

Second Session

  • Paragraph Two- Early life and military career
  • Paragraph Three- Impact and importance of his fundraising
  • Closing Paragraph- Summarise what has happened and the importance of the event

 

Throughout your newspaper report, make sure you include these features.

  • Varied punctuation (commas, brackets, dashes, semi-colons, colons, hyphens)
  • Passive voice (The money was raised by Captain Tom Moore.)
  • Varied sentence openers
  • Correct speech punctuation
  • Journalistic vocabulary 
  • Newspaper features in the image below

Maths

 

1. Rounding Decimals Fluency Work

2. Music Store Rounding Decimals Challenge

3. Multiplying and Dividing Decimals by 10, 100 and 1000 

4. Multiplying and Dividing Decimals Challenges

5. Decimals Reasoning Challenges

Science

 

1. Making a Lava Lamp

 

Ingredients:

  • Water
  • Vegetable Oil
  • A Clear Plastic Bottle or Jar
  • Food Colouring
  • Effervescent tablets

 

  1. Fill the bottle/jar a quarter full with water.
  2. Top up, almost to the top, with vegetable oil.
  3. They should separate into two layers, water at the bottom and oil sitting on top.
  4. Add about 6-8 drops of food colouring once the oil and water have separated.
  5. The colour will mix with the water at the bottom.
  6. Pop in half an effervescent tablet and watch the bubbles form. Add more tablets bit by bit to keep the bubbles rising and falling.

 

Why do the mixtures separate? Write a conclusion to say what happened.

2. Odd One Out Challenge

 

Which one of these foods is the odd one out?

Make valid points for each one and write the similarities and differences.

Think about:

  • Appearance
  • What they do
  • Where they might be found

Topic

1. Viking Runes

 

Watch the video below to learn about the Viking alphabet and writing system. 

 

Use the Viking Runes (which are underneath the video) to write the following information about yourself.

My name is ____________.

I am ______ years old.

My favourite subject is __________.

My favourite hobby is ____________.

 

Add three more sentences about yourself.

 

2. Researching Viking Longships

 

Sketch a replica Viking longship by watching the video below. Research the features of a longship and the names of the different parts of the longship. Annotate your sketch with them.

3. How were Viking longships made and used?

 

Research how the Vikings made their longships and how they worked. Write a fact file about the longships making sure you include the following information. 

 

  • Why did the Vikings build longships?
  • What were the main parts of the longship?
  • How was a longship made?
  • How did they travel any distance in the longship?
  • How did they find their way when sailing?
  • What did they do if there was no wind?
  • How did they shelter from bad weather?
  • How did they sleep on the longship?

Watch the video clip on the website link below for more information about Viking longships. 

 

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/clips/zgmxpv4 

PE, Yoga and Mindfulness

1. Circuit Training

 

High knees- 20 seconds
Burpees- 20 seconds
Squat jumps- 20 seconds
30 second rest and then repeat twice

 

Mountain climbers- 20 seconds
Sit ups- 20 seconds
Hold the plank- 20 seconds
30 second rest and then repeat twice

2. Sun Salutations and Relaxation Activities

3. Fit Dice Game

 

Create your own circuit training workout with the Fit Dice game.

4. Yoga Class 

 

Complete the 15-minute yoga class below. 

Week Commencing 30.03.2020

English

 

  1. Use the show not tell method to write an extract for a story that is based in the setting below.

    Remember to consider:

    • How the characters movements link to their feelings.
    • How the characters show their emotions.
    • How the characters speak.

2. Create a story plan for each of the following spooky story prompts. Use the story mountain as a starting point for your story. 

3. Use your plans to write two spooky stories. 

Remember to include:

  • Short sentences
  • Spooky vocabulary
  • Show not tell method
  • Varied punctuation (brackets, dashes, colons, semi colons, hyphens, commas, full stops)
  • Sentence openers (adverb, verb, subordinate clauses)
  • Speech which is punctuated correctly
  • Setting and character descriptions

4. Write a book review for your current reading book. Use the example in the exercise book to help you.

5. Design a book cover for your favourite book. 

6. Practise spellings from the list provided last week. 

Maths

1. Complete the rounding numbers work:

2. Complete the following challenges:

3. Complete the emoji codebreaking task.

4. Complete challenges on TTRockstars.

Science

Answer the following questions:

1. What if there was no gravity?

  • Write a diary about your daily routine without gravity!
    • How would you brush your teeth and get dressed?
    • How would your house stay on the ground?

 

2. Can I speed up how fast ice melts?

  • Design an experiment with a clear method which would help you discover if you could speed up the process of melting.
    • What equipment would you need?
    • How would you measure your results?
    • Is there a way to improve the validity?

 

3. What if all humans looked the same?

  • Design a poster that has pros and cons related to the discussion.
  • How would we identify one another if we all looked the same?
  • What if all animals of the same species were identical in size?

Topic

1. Sketch a replica Viking longship. Think about tone and texture. Watch the link below to learn how to sketch a longship.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sEQn3vMD05g

2. Design and create your own Viking longship using resources from home.

Week Commencing 23.03.2020

Name
 School Closure Tasks Y6.pdfDownload
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